MCL Blogs

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed everything. Every person, every family, every organization has to think differently now, including Multnomah County Library.

Some of the changes required by this new reality include changes in staffing. While living with the pandemic, we have significant limits to in-person service and far fewer in-person library users than we did before. Therefore, we are in the difficult process of reducing some jobs for the duration of the pandemic. (I wrote here to explain why). 

There has been incorrect information going around about what’s happening at the library, and I want to make sure the public is up to date and has accurate information.

This library has made major adjustments over the past few months, adding new services like expanded online access and curbside book pickup — and more adaptations are on the way. We know how much our community values library resources, and the hardworking and dedicated library staff, who are the heartbeat of Multnomah County Library. 

We are working with the union representing library workers — AFSCME Local 88 — to help people who ultimately will be laid off from their library jobs. While no one has been laid off yet, the union contract between Multnomah County and Local 88 guides this process and sets rules, mostly based on seniority, for who can stay and who must leave when positions are cut.

As we reduce the size of our workforce, we are working closely with the union to minimize the impacts of layoffs in the following ways:

  • Offering incentives for voluntary retirement and voluntary layoff
  • Identifying impactful new services that can be delivered within COVID constraints
  • Looking for job placement options at Multnomah County for pandemic response and other kinds of work

Some have overstated the scale of the planned library layoffs and expressed concern about the impact on staff members who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color. The library has about 580 employees. We currently expect to reduce represented staff by 79 positions, with an additional six positions moving from full time to part time. It is our hope and expectation that at least some of the people filling these positions will not be out of work, but will fill other positions at Multnomah County. This number is lower than our original projections and is a result of our collaborative discussions with union leadership and library employees.

We hope to reduce the number of layoffs even further and will know the final number by the end of August. We will look creatively at options for every single person and strive to support them during this difficult process.

Our library has worked hard to hire more staff who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) especially in recent years. Some of those workers’ positions have additional Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSA) protections, tied to language and culture. Other BIPOC staff members have jobs without those protections and have a higher chance of being “bumped” by staff with greater seniority. Those are factors we cannot change since they are governed by the union contract. We have severely limited reductions of those KSA positions to four positions because our priorities focus on serving BIPOC communities and others most affected by the pandemic.

Since the pandemic began, the library has used staff input to work in new ways. Through innovative online programs, modified summer reading, expanded access on subjects that matter, free summer lunches, reaching out to seniors and homebound patrons, outreach with community partners and more, we have expanded our work. 

The library will continue to look and listen to its staff for impactful ideas and suggestions that we can put into place quickly and over time to help our community. This week, the library will begin outdoor computer labs. Next up is free mobile printing at all locations. We will loan Chromebooks and wi-fi hotspots and offer remote technology help. We have received lots of other ideas and proposals we will develop and act on.

The library will do everything it can right now to offer options, support and compassion in this process. We will focus on helping our community recover, with a workforce aligned to do that. We will also keep our eye on the horizon with a vision to better serve future generations.

Vailey Oehlke, director of libraries
 

Image of wordless books
“Wordless book” sounds like a contradiction. But wordless books use illustrations to tell a story, with very few or even no words included with the pictures. Believe it or not, they can actually be a great way to help anyone trying to grow their reading skills, no matter their age or what languages they speak at home.

One important part of reading is decoding the shapes of letters and seeing them as words, but there are other skills that are just as important. Learning to read in any language involves:

  • knowing what words mean (vocabulary),
  • figuring out how they make sense together in a sentence (context), and 
  • understanding what sentences mean all together (comprehension).

Wordless books can be great tools for growing and strengthening all three of those skills for new and more experienced readers, including for a wide variety of reader ages. You can see some examples of this in these videos in English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, and Vietnamese, showing ways to read the book Draw! by Raúl Colón.

When there aren’t written words to rely on for a story, readers can become active characters in the story and talk more about what’s happening in the illustrations. Adults and teens use a lot of unusual words that don’t come up in regular, daily conversations to describe the setting and characters and to ask questions about what is going on. Children flex their creativity and observation muscles as they look at and think about the illustrations. They practice asking questions and coming up with answers as they figure out what is happening and what might happen next. Together you can decide what characters are saying and thinking or even make up your own stories based on what the readers see and interpret. All of that literacy development happens with no written words at all.

Whether you regularly use wordless books in your family reading or are just getting started, here are some ideas:

  • Remember there are no right or wrong ways to read a wordless book! It’s all about the conversations between kids and caregivers, and those will be different from reading to reading and kid to kid.
  • Think about first taking a “story walk” through the book. Look through the pages to get children used to the book and the illustrations. We all know kids love reading books over and over again!
  • Try taking a look at the book from cover to cover. Sometimes artists hide fun details on the front/back cover, the title page, and even under the removable paper cover that comes with some books (usually called a dust jacket or dust cover).
  • Maybe ask questions like “what do you see?” and “what is going on in this picture?” and “what do you see that makes you say that?” (borrowed from Visual Thinking Strategies)
  • Encourage children to tell the story in their own words and help them learn new words  when they ask for more information about  an emotion or concept. Example: “yes, that duck looks angry and sad. Do you know what that feeling is called? Some people call it frustration, like when you’re sad you don’t get to do something and you’re mad about it, too.”
  • Have fun with it!

For some great, inclusive wordless book suggestions, take a look at the booklist Wordless (or mostly wordless) books for all ages, including some for teens and even adults. 

Physical distancing doesn’t mean social distancing. Staying in touch with family and friends is important. Games can be a way to connect with the kids in your life or to connect your kids with their friends and family while at home. Whether one, two or multi-player, there are some good options for free apps and online games for preschoolers to tweens to teens.

photo of iPad with children's app icons

The Association for Library Service to Children creates an annual Notable Children's Digital Media list that has web-based and app-based games for pre-k up through middle school (some free, some for a small fee) and the Excellence in Early Learning Digital Media Award has suggestions for younger children.

Common Sense Media posts reviews and rates based on developmental criteria and factors such as ease of play, positive messages, violence, and consumerism. Reviews from parents and kids are also available.Their site has lists of suggestions for free online games and free apps that can be sorted by age. 

Check out Online Games for Families to Play Together, an article from Parents magazine. It includes some classics and some new ones, and it’s a good starting point for multi-generational game ideas. Another article shares 15 free online learning games.

Board Game Arena has thousands of games for all ages--Connect Four, Battleship, Can't Stop, King Domino, and Carcassonne to name a few. Games can be played by inviting friends or joining tables. You can also change the language for the site and play.

If branded games are okay, many networks have kids gaming sites that tie in with their characters. Some of those are PBS Kids, Disney Jr., Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and Nick Jr

Toca Boca has a lot of different games that are great for creative, open-ended play. They offer a good amount of gameplay for free, but you can purchase additional content. 

Loteria is a traditional Latin American bingo game you can play on Google Doodle Loteria. Begin by clicking the red play button for the video at the top of your screen. You can play with friends by sharing the link it gives you.

And if you ask kids, they will say Minecraft! Minecraft Classic can be played for free online although players can't save their progress.

The 14-year-old gamer son of one of our librarians suggested Forza for middle schoolers and older. Forza is a series of car racing games that is available from Microsoft Games to play on different devices.

Whatever the gaming choice, talking with your children about going online is always a good idea. SafeKids.com, Connect Safely and the Federal Trade Commission have resources for parents and children.

Have fun and game on!

July 28, 2020

On July 7, Multnomah County Library notified its staff that it has made the difficult decision to reduce its workforce. Layoffs will be effective September 30. This is a sad turn of events for everyone at Multnomah County Library. Like other large public library systems, along with businesses, schools and other organizations, our library’s decisions are being driven by COVID-19 and its significant impact on library services and operations for the foreseeable future. 

This is a sad and frustrating decision to make, and I know it is harder for those whose jobs are impacted. We have looked at many ways this library serves the community, but given the very real impact of physical limitations on our services, the library cannot accommodate work for all of the staff it employs.

I want to share with you how we made this decision and what we will do next. In March, when library buildings closed to the public, we had little information about the virus and we hoped for the library closure to be brief. We asked staff who could do their jobs remotely to do so, and we continued to pay the salary and benefits of workers whose jobs cannot be done remotely. As COVID-19 continues to spread within communities everywhere, and state and public health guidelines place limitations on in-person interactions, it became clear we needed to plan around this scenario for a much longer period of time.

Many of the library’s 19 public locations are very small (the smallest at about 3,600 square feet). Considering building layout, exits, restrooms, shelving and furniture and maximum occupancy guidelines, any return to in-building library service must take place with stark limitations. It is reasonable to assume that those requirements will be in place for the foreseeable future. About half of library staff have jobs that require in-person work, such as physically moving library materials. There isn’t enough room inside library buildings to accommodate everyone in the current era. 

The library must honor its obligation to the public that funds the library by acting as a thoughtful and transparent steward of public resources. It’s not business-as-usual. In consultation with the Multnomah County Chair’s Office, Library District Board, and the library’s leadership team, I reached the difficult conclusion that the library cannot pay a significant portion of its workforce indefinitely for work they are not able to do during the pandemic. In this situation, there is simply no good choice at hand. 

The decision to reduce our workforce is not a reflection of the quality of work from staff across the library system, and it doesn't mean that all staff who can't work remotely will be let go. Library staff members have worked in innovative and creative ways during this pandemic. We are currently offering holds pickup by appointment, summer lunches at some locations and a wide range of services online, by phone, email and chat. Our library and its staff members have greatly expanded available resources and made some programs virtual offerings

Looking forward, the library is actively working to shift existing services and stand up new services in a virtual environment, with input from library staff, and in alignment with Multnomah County Library’s priorities. We are planning for library services that look different than they are now, like outdoor computer access and loaning of wi-fi hotspots and Chromebooks. We will look first to recall library staff members for this work wherever possible. Even when we are able to resume some in-building services, it will not be the same as before.

I am deeply grateful to the talented and dedicated workers who make libraries a treasured community asset. We are working with the library’s labor union, AFSCME Local 88, to finalize details of the reduction according to the labor agreement and will notify impacted staff members directly. Our plans involve a series of measures intended to mitigate the impact of workforce reduction on affected staff members, including health care and other benefits for the three months after separation. While such measures don’t fundamentally change the loss of a livelihood, it’s something we can do to make a bad situation a small amount better.

Multnomah County Library is focused on helping our community recover from the pandemic. The library will center race in its work and emphasize efforts that serve those who are the most deeply impacted, with health and safety at the fore. I look forward to the time when these profoundly challenging constraints no longer exist. I am confident that the library will emerge from this crisis with a sharpened focus on our mission of service, even in the most trying of times.

Vailey Oehlke, Director of Libraries
Multnomah County Library
 

As Carla Davis knows well, library storytime is a playful and magical experience— a time full of singing, dancing, playing, and yes— also reading stories. Storytime programs enable Carla to introduce babies and toddlers to the library, while also connecting with parents about ways to continue to support their child’s literacy and learning. 

“The library is about exploration, and I love that I get to bring that to children,” said Carla. 

Carla Davis Youth Librarian

Carla, or even “Ms. Carla” as some of her young storytime attendees often like to call her, is a Youth Librarian at Midland Library, and she organizes several storytimes each week, in addition to serving as a storytime mentor teaching other library staff how to build age appropriate storytime curriculum and connect with young patrons. Carla is also part of Multnomah County Library’s Black Cultural Library Advocates (BCLA) team which focuses on bringing culturally relevant materials, programs and services to the Black community.

Since the closure of Multnomah County libraries in mid-March due to COVID-19, librarians like Carla have continued to support the community through this crisis. Carla has been working with a team of other Youth Librarians and BCLA staff to bring their storytimes online (find Carla’s virtual Black storytimes on the MCL Youtube It’s Black Storytime playlist). In addition, she is working with the Black Cultural Library Advocates Team to provide valuable resource information online for the Black community— everything from food and health to educational resources. Carla also volunteered to support Multnomah County’s emergency shelters, working shifts at the Oregon Convention Center shelters.

“It was a valuable  opportunity for my teammates and I to serve in the shelters. It’s always rewarding to not only help, but to meet and get to know great people who reside there,” said Carla

Carla started her career with Multnomah County Library as a Clerk. She later went on to earn her Masters in Library Science from Pratt University in New York. She’s worked with various libraries such as  Atlanta Fulton Public, and Shearman and Sterling Law Library as an intern. Like many library professionals, she was drawn to a career in the library from a love of books.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, Carla was working with a team of library staff from across the county on a community engagement project with the Coalition of Communities of Color aimed at helping prepare Black children ages 0-6, and their families, for kindergarten. 

The project is supported by the Equitable Education Grant from Meyer Memorial Trust and The Library Foundation. Recently, she initiated a survey at the largest national Martin Luther King (MLK) program in Portland. It included parents of Black children ages 0-6, and their awareness of library storytimes and services.  

“It is my hope that as our Education Equity team learns more about the needs of parents and educators, that Multnomah County Library will be a major conduit through which educational gaps will be filled in even more creative ways as a result of these and other kinds of assessments.” 

Carla’s dedication and service to children and families was recently nationally recognized by the American Library Association, and awarded the 2020 Random House Penguin Young Readers Group Award and stipend for her comprehensive programming efforts at Midland Library. Beyond organizing and delivering numerous weekly storytimes, Carla hosted a teen-led Teen Talent Showcase and organized a Black History Gospel Timeline that shows how gospel music developed from the 18th century to the present day. 

“Being in a library is the best kind of ‘work,” she said. “I love to be in an environment where I can  “theoretically” read— even though in reality I’m usually busy preparing for programs, working with community organizations, and helping youth and families navigate the library.”

After more than 20 years in library service, Carla sees the library evolving as a hub for the community, especially as people look to the library for services beyond books and traditional programs. 

“As we shift in the way we serve due to the crisis, thankfully the library has always been a viable source of online information and resources, and we will continue to expand the ways we deliver to our users.”

The words We Must Act in white on a black square background
Over the past days and weeks, we have witnessed horrific and senseless anti-Black violence that has taken place at the hands of police and others. George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor are among the lives lost most recently, but this violence has been embedded into the fabric of our society since 1619. Outrage, pain and deep sadness are at the forefront for many of our staff, patrons and community members. 

Multnomah County Library stands in solidarity and in support of our Black community, not just in this moment of crisis but as we look forward to working collectively to end inequity and systemic racism in our community and across the country. To combat the systemic racism that has perpetuated violence and inequities in our communities of color, we must act, not just feel. Multnomah County Library is taking action and we will expand those actions.

As Director, I will:

  • Affirm and validate the harm that hundreds of years of racism and oppression causes and has caused Black, Indigenous, People of Color and other marginalized communities
  • Lead the library’s efforts with race at the fore
  • Center Black, Indigenous, People of Color and other marginalized communities in our service
  • Rethink the library’s exclusionary history and redefine the library’s legacy through action
  • Check my own biases and assumptions alongside those of the institution I lead

Finally and importantly, I want to honor library staff—and one member, in particular, Elle Budd, a Library Assistant on the Black Cultural Library Advocates team—who started something incredible in the past few days. Elle took the brave step of emailing hundreds of their colleagues to share perspective and resources around the history of violent protest in America in an effort  “. . . to cultivate a very different culture here at the library where we talk about anti blackness, whiteness, white supremacy, racism, and how we as an institution are working to uphold it.” It was the perfect step in that moment.

Others engaged, expressing support, gratitude, solidarity, acknowledgement, willingness to hear and learn and offered even more resources. I will list some of those below but—to me—this was especially resonant, Sam Cooke's incredible and inspiring A Change is Gonna Come

Here’s a portion of what library staff have shared with their peers:

And here are some additional resources from the library’s website:

This library will be part of the change that’s gonna come.

Vailey
 

Difficult conversations are happening in our country, states, cities and homes about race, racism, and anti-racism. These are not topics only for adults though. Talking with teens, tweens and younger children is important. Research has shown that children as young as six months notice race [Children Are Not Colorblind: How Young Children Learn Race by Erin N. Winkler, Ph.D. University of Wisconsi-Milwaukee, PACE Vol. 3-No. 3,  2009 HighReach Learning Inc]. 

If you are unsure how to start and continue talking with your children as they grow, there are books to share and websites with resources to help. Several of these also discuss how you can be a model since actions often talk louder than words.

Teaching Young Children About Race is a guide for parents and teachers from Teaching for Change

EmbraceRace.org has articles, webinars and action guides about how kids learn about race, seeing and talking about differences, using picture books to have meaningful conversations, and more.

Talking about Race from the National Museum of African American History & Culture shares reflection questions, videos, and links to other resources.

Teaching Tolerance was created for educators, but parents may also find it useful to discuss race and ethnicity, and rights and activiism among other topics. The home page currently features articles about Black Lives Matter and Teaching about Race, Racism and Police Violence.

Talking to Children about Racial Bias from the American Academy of Pediatrics includes how parents can confront their own racial bias and a doctor's story of his encounter with racism as a 7-year-old.

Explaining the News to Our Kids from Common Sense Media offers tips by age.

 

The library may be closed and people are staying home, but it doesn't mean parents and caregivers are alone in trying to help young children learn and develop.  This collection of resources includes articles, videos, webinars, and activities to help parents and caregivers support their children's healthy development during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

For parents:

How to Support Children (and Yourself) During the COVID-19 Outbreak
The Center on the Developing Child offers three main activities that can help parents promote their young child’s healthy development and manage their own stress during the pandemic. PDFs are provided in both English and Spanish.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus
From PBS Kids for Parents website. A parent shares how she talked with her children about the coronavirus. Includes “four ways we can help young kids build germ-busting habits.” The article is also available in Spanish.

A support guide for parents raising babies and toddlers through the coronavirus crisis
This article from Quartz offers reassurance to parents who are concerned that their child is missing out on opportunities for growth and development during these times of uncertainty and isolation. Included are resources to help keep young children engaged and learning, ideas for parental self-care, and links to sources of information about child development.

For childcare providers:

5 ways early care and education providers can support children’s remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
From Child Trends.

Trauma and Resilience: The Role of Child Care Providers
A webinar focused on the effect of trauma on children’s learning.It addresses the role of teachers and providers using resilience building strategies to support children across the age continuum.

For anyone interested in children’s development and well-being:

Being Black Is Not A Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child
This report from the National Black Child Development Institute includes articles such as “ The Black Family: Re-Imagining Family Support and Engagement” and highlights successful programs like Great Beginnings for Black Babies, Inc.

How to Teach Children to Stay 6 Feet Apart
Tips on how to teach social distancing to children from No Time for Flashcards.

Resources for Supporting Children’s Emotional Well-being during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Guidance, recommendations, and resources provided by child trauma experts at Child Trends and the Child Trauma Training Center at the University of Massachusetts.

Resilience
A short video and an article about how children build resilience from the Center on the Developing Child.

What Is COVID-19? And How Does It Relate to Child Development?
From the Center on the Developing Child: “An infographic that explains the basics of what COVID-19 is, and what it can mean for stress levels in both children and adults… it explains how all of us can work to ensure the wellbeing of the community now and in the future”. PDFs are available in English and Spanish.

More information:

2 Ways COVID-19 is Creating Even Greater Inequities in Early Childhood Education
A brief article from The Education Trust, a national nonprofit that works to close opportunity gaps that disproportionately affect students of color and students from low-income families.

The Brain Architects Podcast: COVID-19 Special Edition: Creating Communities of Opportunity
Dr. David Williams discusses ways in which the coronavirus pandemic is particularly affecting people of color in the U.S., and what that can mean for early childhood development. 

Thinking About Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Impacts Through a Science-Informed, Early Childhood Lens
An article from the Center for the Developing Child.

With the rapid changes in response to COVID-19, teens are under a great deal of stress. They are struggling with adapting to online school, being isolated from their friends, and losing out on important milestones and opportunities. As parents and caregivers are working through their own stresses and difficulties, it can be difficult to know how to support teens during this time. Here are some resources to help.

Library resources

If you don't already have a library card, you can sign up for a temporary card online.

Find great young adult audio and e-books on Overdrive Teens.

Stream movies and music, and find graphic novels and comics on Hoopla.

Even though the library isn’t recruiting Summer Reading volunteers this year, we will still have the Summer Reading Program. It starts June 15 and participants can play online or with a paper game board. The grand prize is the choice of a Technology Package or an Experience Portland Family Fun Package.

Check out more resources highlighted on our teen page.

Mental and emotional health

Teens can get peer support from YouthLine. No problem is too big or too small. Call 877.968.8491 or text 83986. YouthLine has also created a list of support resources specifically for COVID-19.

UNICEF has six strategies for how teens can cope with COVID-19.

John Krasinski of The Office launched a YouTube Channel called Some Good News to help lift spirits during quarantine.

With nearly 7.5 million followers, Yoga with Adriene is a very high quality YouTube channel. She has videos on meditation, physical fitness, and using yoga to process emotions.

Teens can help combat the spread COVID-19 in their communities by donating homemade masks to Multnomah County Joint Response. The CDC has instructions on how to make and properly use cloth face masks.

Resources for parents and caregivers

For up-to-date information and resources, check the Multnomah County page on COVID-19.

The Education Development Center has tips for Parenting an Older Teen in a COVID-19 World.

The Search Institute has a Relationships Checkup tool for parents, other caregivers and educators.

Quaranteengers: Strategies for Parenting in Close Quarters, a New York Times article, offers advice on how parents and caregivers can support teens during quarantine.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has created a helpful fact sheet for parents and caregivers. It contains a table broken down by age group that lists some common reactions children and teens might have to stress as well as ways that parents and caregivers can support youth. 

It’s also important to take care of yourself while taking care of others. Here are some resources for self-care for parents and caregivers.

National Parent Helpline, 1.855.427.2736

Mental Health and Coping with Stress from the CDC

Why Parents Need Self-Compassion During the Coronavirus Pandemic from the Chidlren's Hospital of Philadelphia

Parenting During Coronavirus: You Are Enough from PBS Parents

 

by Jane Salisbury, MCL volunteer

Clarissa Littler had volunteered since 2016 for Multnomah County Library, teaching computer skills at neighborhood libraries, and teaching programming and other skills at the Rockwood Library Makerspace, but when the COVID-19 pandemic came to Oregon early in 2020, she embarked on an entirely new venture: using 3D printers to make face shields and other protective equipment to help frontline workers all over Multnomah County. 

Clarissa’s path to this amazing project was long and full: she was a physicist and a computer science researcher who eventually began working in curriculum design, with an emphasis on programs for teens. She worked as the director of curriculum design for Pixel Arts Game Education, a non-profit whose mission is to create safe learning spaces for young people to play and design games together. When the schools closed for the year because of the pandemic, she had time on her hands.

All over the world, the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) was rising, and designers were developing plans that could be used on ordinary 3D printers. A Czech company called Prusa developed a 3D printer design for a face shield that could be used widely. Using the makerspace equipment at Rockwood Library, and working with Ben Sanford, the makerspace coordinator, Clarissa began working 10-hour days making face shields. These are being distributed through OHSU and Portland Public Schools to frontline workers. Clarissa said, “During the COVID-19 outbreak, I was so glad to be able to use the makerspace. I really wanted to do something to help. I learned so much in the actual doing of this project.” 

Beyond her wonderful dedication to the library and her work as a curriculum designer, Clarissa pursues many interests: philosophy, art, and music, including a genre called algorithmic music, a subset of electronic music, which involves using coding to compose and perform music live. She reads widely. For example, at the moment, she is reading The Affect Theory Reader, a scholarly text, and a cozy mystery involving witches, which she describes as “silly fluff.”

Asked which book has influenced her most deeply, Clarissa cited The Phenomenology of Perception, by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. She spoke of its deep implications for consciousness and its exploration of how we perceive the world.

The library is deeply important in Clarissa’s life. She’s happy to have a good stack of books that she snagged before library buildings closed to the public. But more seriously, she said, “I see libraries as the last bastion of community space...it’s something I care about. I can get academic texts through interlibrary loan that I couldn’t possibly afford otherwise. I hope to continue working in the library.”  

Before the closure, Clarissa often walked the two miles from her home to Woodstock Library to pick up her books and spend time there. And she often took the bus to different libraries, way up to St. Johns, for example, to read and code and write in the comfort and community of the library space, which she values so highly. Her remarkable dedication and love of the library is a bright light in these complex times. 

The coronavirus pandemic is challenging for everyone. For the community of children experiencing autism, it can be especially confusing. Here are some suggestions for help with navigating the crisis.

For fun

Enjoy the videos in Multnomah County Library's It's Storytime! collection, especially the Sensory Storytime playlist. Mix and match the short videos in this growing collection to create the perfect storytime for your child.

Spectrum Storytime with Ethan - fun books read by a very engaging young man who is on the spectrum.

Inclusive Storytime, Hillsboro Library & PSU - This collaborative storytime,  specifically designed for kids with varying learning styles and abilities, has moved online. Join the Facebook group and gain access to all of the parent guides and videos they have created. 

For information

Disability Rights Oregon - Know Your Rights: Education Rights During COVID-19 outlines a process for assessing and advocating for your child’s educational needs.

COVID-19 Resources for Families of Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs from the Oregon Health Authority provides a similar list of resources to this one.

DIY Ways to Meet a Child's Sensory Needs at Home from Edutopia. Occupational therapists and trauma-informed teachers weigh in on how to create sensory tools and spaces with what you have at home.

FACTOregon.com shares Additional COVID-19 Resources, a compilation of resources relating to COVID-19 and education. They have a series of Distance Learning Webinars (Sample: Special Education and the IEP: Distance Learning Edition) and the “Special Education and Distance Learning: What You Need to Know Toolkit” available in English and Spanish.

Autism Society of Oregon Resources for School Closure has created a page with links to a variety of homeschooling sites, activities, virtual tours, exercise and more.

Understood.com Coronavirus Latest Updates and Tips has a LOT of resources to help parents and atypical children cope with learning and supporting your child at home. Here’s one example: Stuck at Home? 20 Learning Activities to Keep Kids Busy

The National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations (NCPMI) provides Emergencies and National Disasters: Helping Children and Families Cope, a collection of resources for parents of young children that include charts and a number of social stories to help your child understand what’s happening.

Các Thư viện

  • Tất cả thư viện Quận Multnomah đóng cửa do dịch COVID-19 cho đến khi có thông báo thêm. Xin đừng trả lại thư liệu cho thư viện trong thời gian này. Quý vị sẽ không bị tính phí trả muộn.
  • Chúng tôi nhớ quý vị!

Cách Tận Hưởng Thư viện Trực Tuyến của Quý vị

Dịch vụ/Chương trình tạm ngừng

  • Những chương trình, lịch biểu có gặp gỡ trực tiếp tạm ngừng cho đến tháng 8.
  • Các thư viện hủy bỏ hoặc không chấp nhận đơn đặt trước phòng họp cho đến tháng 8.

Khi nào Thư viện sẽ mở cửa lại?

Thư viện Quận Multnomah sẽ mở cửa lại khi có sự chỉ đạo của Chủ tịch Deborah Kafoury và hướng dẫn từ các quan chức y tế cộng đồng. Mặc dù hiện tại chưa có ngày tháng xác định, nhưng thư viện đang theo dõi tình hình chặt chẽ, và đang lập kế hoạch để khôi phục lại dịch vụ thư viện khi thấy an toàn để làm như vậy.

Xin vô trang COVID-19 của Quận Multnomah để biết thêm thông tin mới cập nhật về y tế và nguồn lực cộng đồng.

Cindy and her dog, Maddie
Cindy Hiday is the author of Iditarod Nights, a Library Writers Project book that has recently been published in partnership with Ooligan Press. 


People love dogs! What inspired you to write about the Iditarod Sled Dog Race in particular?

I became hooked on the sport when I read Race Across Alaska: First woman to win the Iditarod tells her story, by Libby Riddles and Tim Jones. I'm drawn to stories about women who are courageous under pressure, as Libby Riddles certainly was when she found herself exhausted and caught in a blizzard during the race. When I read about a local woman who put her career on hold to train and compete in the Iditarod, I had the spark of an idea for my heroine in Iditarod Nights. For a time, the research consumed me. I discovered there is so much more behind the Iditarod – from its early beginnings to its present-day sport – than most people realize. I admire the veteran mushers, their dedication and how they put their dogs' wellbeing ahead of their own. And I fell in love with the dogs! They are amazing athletes; the sheer joy in their expressions when they're hooked up to a sled is thrilling!

Are there common themes you find yourself drawn to in your writing and the books you read?

My author brand is writing in the spirit of adventure and happy endings; that's my promise to my readers. The more challenging and seemingly impossible the adventure, the better. There has to be character growth beyond what the character believes themselves capable of. And even though I put my characters on an emotional rollercoaster, there is always a happy outcome. I want a story, whether one of my own or someone else's, to leave me with a good feeling. I'm not genre-specific in what I write or read. To date, I've published three contemporary romances and a humorous adventure novel. If it's a good story, I don't care if it's a romance or western or sci-fi/fantasy. I just finished reading Nora Roberts' dystopian series Chronicles of the OneI'm a huge Stephen King fan, especially his Dark Tower series and Christine, and Whiskey When We're Dry, by John Larison, knocked my socks off!

What can readers expect from Cindy Hiday next?

My current work-in-progress, Come Snowfall, takes place in 1880's eastern Oregon and is about a twelve-year-old girl who discovers how far she's willing to go to save her family. My husband and I went camping near Baker City last summer to research the area where my story begins, near the Elkhorns and Wallowas, and we visited the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. It's beautiful country, and it has been fascinating to learn about the history of that era, the pioneering west. I hope to have the book finished by the end of the year.

Who inspires you in your life?

Resilient people. People who find the silver lining or a solution to a challenging situation. People who don't know the meaning of the word "can't"; And kind people. Something as simple as a smile from a stranger can brighten my entire day.

Para ver esta información en inglés, haga clic en Meal resources for families. To see this information in English, click Meal resources for families.

Aquí puede encontrar información de los distritos escolares, agencias y restaurantes que sabemos que están ayudando a la comunidad. Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora o un dispositivo móvil, por favor haga clic en la esquina superior derecha donde dice “Select language” y busque su idioma preferido.

Actualizaremos nuevamente según sea necesario, pero por favor confirme la disponibilidad de comidas a través de los enlaces que se comparten a continuación o llame al número de teléfono de la organización.

La Biblioteca del Condado de Multnomah [actualizado 21/06/2022]

La Biblioteca de Midland ofrecerá un almuerzo de verano gratuito para niños y adolescentes de 18 años o menos. El almuerzo de verano estará disponible de 12 a 1 de la tarde, de lunes a viernes, comenzando el 5 de julio hasta el 5 de agosto. Las comidas se proporcionarán en la gran sala de reuniones, con actividades como manualidades y kits STEM. No es necesario inscribirse. 

El almuerzo de verano es patrocinado por Wattles Boys & Girls Club, y es parte de un programa federal, Summer Food Service Program.

Centennial [actualizado 08/06/2022]

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora, por favor haga clic en la esquina superior derecha donde dice “Translate” y busque su idioma preferido.

Todos los miércoles de 4:30 p.m. a 6:00 p.m., hay una despensa de comida en la cafetería de la Escuela Primaria Patrick Lynch, 1546 SE 169th PL, Portland. Traiga sus propias bolsas y recoja 3-5 días de comida gratis para su familia. 

Comida Para Familias distrubuirá comida el segundo y cuarto miércoles de junio, julio y agosto en Centennial High School, 3505 SE 182nd Ave, Gresham, 97030. De 4:00 a 5:00 de la tarde. Click here for distribution dates.                                                               

Corbett [actualizado 11/11/21]

Los estudiantes del Distrito escolar de Corbett que reciben almuerzo gratis o a precio reducido, y las familias en necesidad, pueden recoger almuerzo los lunes de 9:00 a.m. a 1:00 p.m. en la puerta de la cocina en el edificio de usos múltiples (MPB). Estamos tratando de limitar los días de recogida del almuerzo a una vez por semana para reducir la exposición del personal. Si necesita que le entreguen los almuerzos, o estos horarios no funcionan para usted, por favor comuníquese con Seth Tucker por correo electronico: stucker-corbett.k12.or.us

David Douglas [actualizado 21/06/21] 

Hay distribución de comida en los siguientes edificios escolares de David Douglas. La comida para las familias pueden recoger comestibles gratis, no son comidas preparadas para llevar. Puede hacer clic en este enlace para ver el calendario que muestra las horas y los cierres.

Floyd Light Middle: 10800 SE Washington St. los lunes, de 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. EMPEZANDO EL 27 DE JUNIO

Cherry Park Elementary: 1930 SE 104th Ave. los lunes, de 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. EMPEZANDO EL 27 DE JUNIO

Earl Boyles Elementary: 10822 SE Bush St. los martes, de 11:30 a 1:00 p.m. EMPEZANDO EL 27 DE JUNIO

Mill Park Elementary: 1900 SE 117th Ave. los martes, de 1:00 p.m. a 2:30 p.m.

Gilbert Heights Elementary: 12839 SE Holgate Blvd. los viernes, de 9:00 a.m. a 10:00 a.m.

Gilbert Park Elementary: 13132 SE Ramona St. los miércoles, de 11:00 a.m. a 12:30 p.m.

David Douglas High South Building: 1500 SE 130th Ave. los jueves, de 3:30 p.m. a 5:30 p.m. 

Gilbert Park Elementary: 13132 SE Ramona St. los miércoles, de 4:00 p.m. a 5:00 p.m.

Gresham-Barlow [actualizado 18/11/21]

Hay despensas de comida en las siguientes escuelas primarias:

East Gresham Elementary: 900 SE 5th St., Gresham. los martes, 3:00 pm a 4:30 pm

Highland Elementary: 295 NE 24th St., Gresham. el segundo miércoles, 3:15 pm a 5:15 pm

Información adicional sobre despensas de comida está disponible en The Sunshine Division y Snowcap Community Charies.

Parkrose [actualizado 29/06/22]

Hay despensas comunitarias en:

  • Gateway Discovery Park: 10520 NE Halsey St. Del 27 de junio al 26 de agosto (cerrado el 4 de julio), de 11 a.m. a mediodía
  • Parque Luuwit View: NE 127th Ave. y NE Fremont. Del 27 de junio al 26 de agosto (cerrado el 4 de julio). De 12:30 a 13:30 h.
  • Escuela secundaria de Parkrose: 12003 NE Shaver St. Del 27 de junio al 28 de julio (de lunes a jueves). Desayuno de 9:30 a 10:00 a.m., almuerzo de mediodía a 12:45 p.m.
  • Escuela Media de Parkrose: 11800 NE Shaver St. Del 5 al 28 de julio (de lunes a jueves). Desayuno de 8:00 a.m. a 8:30 a.m., almuerzo del mediodía a las 12:45 p.m.
  • Shaver Elementary School, 3701 NE 131st Pl. Los miércoles, de 2:00 pm a 4:00 pm.
  • Parkrose Middle School, 11800 NE Shaver St. Los jueves, de 4:30 pm a 6:30 pm.

 

Portland [actualizado 08/06/22]

La dispensa SEI (SEI Pantry) en Woodlawn Elementary School, 7200 NE 11th Ave., está abierto para el público los miércoles de 5:30 a 7:30 de la tarde

Del sitio web de Portland Public Schools: En asociación con Portland Parks and Recreation, se ofrecerán comidas y actividades gratuitas todos los días en toda la ciudad en los 16 parques del 21 de junio al 20 de agosto. Los almuerzos son gratuitos para todos los niños de la comunidad de 1 a 18 años. Tenga en cuenta que todos los almuerzos se deben comer en las áreas designadas para comida en el parque. Las comidas "Grab and go" (aggarar y llevar) ya no están disponibles según la normativa del USDA y todos los niños deben estar presentes para recibir un almuerzo. No se puede llevar comida a casa. Agradecemos su cooperación y comprensión con esta transición en las reglas de los servicios del año pasado. Pronto se publicará más información sobre el verano, incluyendo los menús y los horarios de servicio.  

Reynolds [actualizado 21/06/22]

Haga clic aquí para obtener información sobre las comidas de verano. Las comidas se servirán de lunes a viernes, del 27 de junio al 5 de agosto, en las siguientes escuelas.

  • Escuela primaria Davis: 19501 NE Davis St. de 12:00 p.m. a 12:45 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Fairview: 225 Main St., Fairview. de 11:15 a.m. a 12:00 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Glenfair: 15300 NE Glisan St. de 12:00 p.m. a 12:45 p.m.
  • Escuela Media H.B. Lee: 1121 NE 172nd Ave. de 12:15 p.m. a 1:00 p.m.
  • Escuela Media Reynolds: 1200 NE 201st Ave., Fairview. de 12:15 p.m. a 1:00 p.m.
  • Escuela Media Walt Morey: 2801 SW Lucas Rd., Troutdale. de 12:15 p.m. a 1:00 p.m.
  • Escuela Primaria Wilkes: 17020 NE Wilkes Rd. de 12:00 p.m. a 12:45 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Woodland: 21607 NE Glisan St., Fairview. de 11:15 a.m. a 12:00 p.m.

 

Agencias y organizaciones [actualizado 26/05/2022]

La información a continuación puede cambiar, así que por favor verifique los enlaces o llame al número de teléfono de la organización, si son provistos.

En el noreste (NE) del Condado de Multnomah

C3 Pantry

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

6120 NE 57th Ave., Portland. Los martes, las puertas abren a las 11:30am, pude empezar sus compras de 12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

Mainspring Food Pantry

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

A principios del 2022, la despensa de alimentos del martes aparecerá en otros sitios, según su página web. Se recomienda seguirles en Facebook para ver dónde tienen lugar.

  • Dawson Park, 1 N Stanton St. El primer martes de cada mes de 10:00 a 12:00

  • Victory Outreach, 16022 SE Stark St. El tercer martes de cada mes de 10:00 a 12:00

  • Kenton Church, 2115 N Lombard St. El cuarto martes de cada mes de 10:00 a 12:00

  • East Portland Community Center, 740 SE 106th Ave. El segundo martes de cada mes de 9:00 a 11:00 de la mañana

Meals 4 Kids

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

Este sitio ayuda a niños y familias que califican dentro de la Ciudad de Portland.  Favor de visitar su sitio web para completar el formulario.

Northeast Emergency Food Program

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

4800 NE 72nd Ave., Portland. Abierto los jueves y sábados 12p.m.-3 p.m.  Las cajas con comidas serán preparadas por adelantado para que puedan pasar a recogerlas.

Portland Adventist Community Services

11020 NE Halsey St., Portland. Ofrecen alimentos preenvasados para llevar. De lunes a viernes de 9 a 11 de la mañana.  También ofrecen un servicio de despensa móvil a algunos barrios.

One Hope Food Pantry

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

Localizado en 5425 NE 27th Ave., Portland 97211. Abierto para recoger la comida en auto los sábados, 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. 

 Se ofrecen cajas con alimentos cada semana y un plato de comida caliente el segundo y cuarto sábado de cada mes. 

En el sureste (SE) del Condado de Multnomah 

Sunshine Division

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

Aquí se proveen cajas con comidas gratuitas para emergencias.  Puede pasar a recogerlas o también se la pueden enviar.  Están localizados en 12436 SE Stark St, Portland, OR 97233.  Para saber los horarios, u obtener más información, por favor visite sunshinedivision.org o llame al 503.609.0285.

vhttps://www.pobcpantry.com/

Localizado en 3223 SE 92nd Ave., Portland, 97266.  Puede recoger cajas de comida, haga clic aquí para más información. Las horas para recoger cajas son los martes, 5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m. y jueves 11 a.m. a 12:30 p.m.

En el noroeste (NW) del Condado de Multnomah 

William Temple House

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés. "Nuestros servicios incluyen una despensa de alimentos, productos de higiene y artículos de primera necesidad. Actualmente nos asociamos con Impact NW para ofrecer asistencia de servicios públicos con cita previa. Además, nuestro navegador está disponible para ayudar a conectar a los usuarios con recursos de la comunidad más allá de William Temple House."

En el suroeste (SW) del Condado de Multnomah 

Life Urban Portland 

Localizado en 1838 SW Jefferson St., Portland 97201.  Las horas del almacén de comida son martes, jueves y viernes, 3:00pm -6:00 pm.  Una lotería que toma 5 minutos antes de abrir determina su lugar en línea. 

Para obtener más información sobre el acceso a los alimentos para las familias, incluyendo el Banco de Alimentos de Oregón, llame al 211 o envíe un mensaje de texto 'FOOD’ o 'COMIDA' al 877-877 también puede visitar oregonfoodfinder.org. Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora, elija su idioma del menú a la mano derecha. 

Self Enhancement Inc también tiene una lista de recursos para obtener alimentarios que incluye sitios en los condados de Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington y Yamhill en escuelas en Oregon y Vancouver, Washington. Elija español en la parte superior a la mano derecha para leer la información en español. 

Partners for a Hunger-free Oregon: La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

También puede ver esta guía de recursos de acceso a alimentos compilada por el congresista Earl Blumenauer (OR-03) y su equipo. La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

 

Guía para aprendizaje en casa.

Las escuelas están cerradas, la biblioteca está cerrada y las fechas de juego se cancelan. ¿Cómo mantendrá a sus hijos activos, comprometidos y aprendiendo? ¿Cómo puedes encontrar un camino entre todos los sitios web y las ideas de redes sociales? 

La Biblioteca del Condado de Multnomah ofrece/tiene disponibles libros, bases de datos y transmisión de audio y video.

Recursos de aprendizaje

Conéctese a nuestra lista de recursos de aprendizaje para obtener enlaces para accesar a libros electrónicos, ayuda de tutoría, aprendizaje de idiomas como Mango Languages, revistas digitales y videos educativos disponibles a través de la Biblioteca del Condado de Multnomah.

Ideas de actividades

¿Necesita ideas para actividades? Overdrive Kids tiene libros electrónicos para aprender a cocinar, a tejer, doblar aviones de papel, hacer creaciones de Lego y algunos libros de chistes para que amplíe su repertorio de chistes contados

Películas y espectáculos ilimitados

Visite Kanopy y haga clic en Kanopy Kids a la derecha de la barra superior para ver una selección de películas y programas para niños en edad preescolar hasta secundaria. Kanopy Kids ofrece videos ilimitados para que sus hijos sean libres de explorar contenido educativo y entretenido.

Cómics y novelas gráficas

Para su lector de cómics y novelas gráficas, Hoopla tiene un modo infantil con Garfield, Nate the Great, Phoebe y su unicornio, y una selección de libros por autores Latinoamericanos . Hoopla también tiene música y películas para toda la familia.

Aprendizaje en el hogar

Para obtener enlaces a información sobre educación en el hogar, excursiones virtuales, lectura, arte y ciencias, consulte las sugerencias del sitio web de Aprendizaje y participación en el hogar. 

Los edificios de la biblioteca pueden estar cerrados, pero su biblioteca es mucho más que un edificio y estamos aquí para ayudarlo.

Resources for older adults

Are you looking for resources and activities for older adults? Check out these great ideas from Library Outreach Services:

Scrabble pieces spelling "support"

 

Resources for caregivers of older adults

Are you a caregiver for an older adult? Find support and resources from these organizations:

  • Timeslips.org has free stories, images and audio to spark meaningful engagement with family members who have dementia. 
  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection is providing multilingual local support for caregivers and older adults. You can call or email ADRC at 503.988.3646 or adrc@multco.us  for 24-hour information and assistance to seniors, people with disabilities, and caregivers.
  • The Alzheimer's Association 24/7 help line (800.272.3900) is providing specialists and master’s-level clinicians to give confidential support and information to people living with Alzheimer’s, caregivers, families and the public.

The library may be closed and people are staying home, but it doesn't mean parents are alone in trying to keep their children feeling safe and keeping anxiety at bay. There are several resources to help parents navigate talking with their children about the coronavirus, school closures, and no playdates. The Child Mind Institute, a national nonprofit whose focus includes children and families struggling with mental health, has suggestions to help.

  • Don’t avoid talking about the coronavirus since most children will already have heard something about it.
  • Share developmentally appropriate information and take your cue from your child. What does your child know, what questions do they have, how are they feeling.
  • If you're anxious, it's not the right time to talk with your child. What can you do to alleviate your own worries?
  • Be reassuring.
  • Routine is important. 
  • Keep talking.

Visit Talking to Kids about the Coronavirus for more in depth suggestions as well as their Supporting Families during COVID-19 page with other tips such as how to make home feel safe and how to avoid passing anxiety on to your kids. Information is also available in Spanish.

Here are other resources to help you talk with your child.

Coronavirus: A book for children by Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson and Nia Roberts, illustrated by Axel Scheffler and with Professor Graham Medley, Professor of Infectious Disease Modelling, serving as consultant. The book is aimed at elementary school children.

Talking to Children about the Coronavirus: A Parent Resource. From the National Association of School Psychologists; available in multiple languages

Coronavirus video from BrainPOP. An entertaining, basic explanation of COVID-19 and needed precautions for elementary age children and young teens.

Comic from NPR. Basic information for youth in a graphic format that can be read in the Blog or downloaded and folded into a zine.

COVID-19 Time Capsule. Created by artist Natalie Long to help families with children during this time. Children can record how they're spending this time as well as how they are feeling. 

Oregon YouthLine. Teens helping teens. Resources on their website as well as open daily from 4p-10p via text, chat, or call. 

Coronavirus: What Kids Can Do. Kids Health has information on COVID-19 for children in English and Spanish and available in audio.  Other sections of their website have information for parents.

Coronavirus Social Story. Little Puddins Blog has a nice, English language "Coronavirus Social Story."

Multnomah County Library has digital resources for you and your child. Below are stories about worrying and resources about practicing mindfulness that may help during this time. For more, check out our E-books and more page.

by Sarah Binns, MCL volunteer

By the time Title Wave volunteer Diane Hogan and I finish our meeting we’ve talked about everything: From politics to cats, from the #metoo movement to how societal gender roles have changed over the past fifty years. I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface of the very interesting life of another one of Multnomah County Library’s fantastic volunteers.

Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Diane and her family moved to Corvallis when she was a pre-teen. She later attended Oregon State University, graduating “with a degree that no longer exists: secretarial studies.” She also got a bachelor’s degree in graphic design at PSU, but long before computer programs were the design method. “I’m not sure I could do it now,” she laughs.

Diane worked for a time as a civil service secretary with organizations like civil defense and the Worker’s Compensation Board. After marrying, she and her husband moved to Portland’s Alberta Street area in the early 1980s. Adventure arrived when her husband got a six month contract to teach in the Czech Republic. Diane laughed remembering their communal living arrangements there, especially being woken late at night by drunken people wandering the halls. She ended up teaching English to students, too: “Their teenagers are a lot more mature than ours!” she recalls.   

Diane started working at Title Wave in 1998, first organizing books in the back room and then becoming a cashier. She says she most appreciates “the great atmosphere and good coworkers. And you know,” she adds, “most volunteers, when they leave for the day, they take a book home.” Besides her time at Title Wave, Diane also volunteers at the cattery at the Oregon Humane Society three days a week and enjoys going out to eat with friends in her Alberta neighborhood. As we parted ways we exchanged cat photos (naturally) and I realized the next time I need a book I might bypass my library—and head to Title Wave to talk to Diane instead!


A few facts about Diane

Home library: Thanks to the wealth of books at Title Wave, “I haven’t been to the library in years!”

Currently reading: Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane. “It’s all about caves!”  

Most influential book: A twenty-volume encyclopedia set called The Book of Knowledge that originally belonged to her grandfather. “It had everything from French lessons to handwriting lessons…”

Favorite book from childhood: Mr. Bear Squash-You-All-Flat by Morrell Gipson. “A few years ago I bought a brand new edition.” 

Favorite place to read: On the couch or on her exercise bike. 

E-reader or paper: “I don’t read e-books!”

 

Photo of a camera
You need a photo or an image for a project you’re working on. You need it fast. You don’t want to pay anything or get sued for copyright violation. Luckily, there are lots of sources on the Web for finding free-to-use images!

Some of these websites include images which are in the public domain (public domain = nobody owns the copyright). Others include images where the creator is giving up some of their copyright protection and allowing you to use their photos and artwork. However, the creator or website may have usage rules: for example, they might require you to tell people where the image came from and who made it. Before you copy or use any image, it’s a good idea to check for usage or licensing rules. 

ImageQuest - https://multcolib.org/resource/imagequest: ImageQuest is a library resource created by the Encyclopædia Britannica. It has millions of images that you can use for non-commercial purposes. The collection includes photos and clip art, and it allows you to sort results by shape (horizontal or vertical rectangle, or square). Information about creator and rights is provided for each image.

Creative Commons logo
Creative Commons Search - https://search.creativecommons.org: Creative Commons is an organization that helps people share content on the Web (photos, videos, writing, anything!) This webpage lets you search for images which have Creative Commons licenses. The licenses are like permission statements: they tell you what you are allowed to do with the image. 

Smithsonian Open Access - https://www.si.edu/openaccess/: The Smithsonian has created this site to provide access to millions of images from their museums, libraries, archives and the National Zoo. Every image is Creative Commons Zero (CC0), meaning that the Smithsonian has waived all of their rights under copyright. There is also a Smithsonian Learning Lab with information about the Open Access collection and ideas for how to use it.

Children reading a wireless newspaper
The Commons - https://www.flickr.com/commons: The Commons is a section of the photo-sharing website Flickr which provides access to images from public photography archives at museums and libraries around the world. It’s a great place to find historic photos, and everyone (including you!) is encouraged to add comments and tags to the images. The photos on this site have “no known copyright restrictions.”

Photo of a flower
Morgue File - https://morguefile.com/: A morgue file is a collection of past materials to use for future projects. In this particular online morgue file, you can find many high resolution stock photos.

Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/en/: Pixabay offers over 1.7 million royalty free stock photos and videos. 

Unsplashhttps://unsplash.com/: Over 1 million free, high-resolution photos shared by a huge online community of photographers. The Unsplash license gives you wide permission to use the images.

Scissors illustration

Are websites not your thing? Do you prefer books? The library has many books of illustrations and prints you can use, on all sorts of topics. To find them, just do a subject search in the library catalog for “clip art.” You’ll find books with images of Victorian women’s fashion, birds, children’s book illustrations, fairies and much more. At the end of this post is a book list showing examples of the types of clip art books that the library owns.

If you have trouble finding the images that you want, or if you have more questions about any of this, ask us for help! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.

Images included in this post:

Voluntaria destacada Gabby Delgado
por Jane Salisbury, voluntaria de MCL

Gaby Delgado ama a los niños. Todo en su vida refleja ese amor, inclusive su servicio durante los últimos tres años como asistente del programa con la Coordinadora de la Biblioteca Delia Palomeque Morales en el programa Listos para el Kínder (“Listos”). Listos es un programa para niños de habla hispana de tres a cinco años y sus padres. Las sesiones se llevan a cabo completamente en español, y los maestros enfatizan las habilidades de aprendizaje temprano, como la alfabetización y matemáticas tempranas, la autorregulación y las habilidades interpersonales. Se anima a los padres a que observen cómo sus hijos aprenden mejor y cómo generar confianza y conexiones con sus hijos a medida que crecen. Las familias de Listos con frecuencia se convierten en usuarios de la biblioteca.

Gaby fue maestra en Perú durante veinticinco años, donde trabajó con padres y niños pequeños, y realizó intervenciones tempranas con bebés. También enseñaba cómo dar masaje a bebés para ayudar a los padres a conectarse más profundamente con sus bebés.

Con su esposo y su hija Ximena, que ahora está en el último año de la escuela secundaria, Gaby fue a la Biblioteca de Gresham una vez a la semana para usar el Internet y hacer conexiones. Cuando vio un volante en la biblioteca sobre el programa Listos, pensó: "Esto es para mí".

Sobre su trabajo, Gaby dice: “Delia es excelente, es un ángel. En el programa Listos, trabajamos directamente con niños de 3 a 5 años, primero juntos y después los niños tienen su propio tiempo. Trabajamos en temas cosas como las letras, formas, colores, números y animamos interacciones positivas entre padres e hijos. Puedo aconsejar a los padres sobre cómo conectarse con sus hijos. Muchas familias son inmigrantes nuevos, quienes sólo hablan español y enfrentan muchos desafíos. Adoro trabajar con ellos”.

Gaby se crió en una familia en donde la lectura es valorada, pero las bibliotecas no eran iguales a como son aquí en Estados Unidos. Explica Gaby, “Las bibliotecas en Perú son muy diferentes; son académicas, silenciosas y solo se puede retirar en préstamo uno o dos libros. Estar en la biblioteca aquí es como estar en casa con la familia de uno”.

Toda la familia de Gaby participa en la biblioteca. Ximena es voluntaria en el program de Lectura de Verano, y el esposo de Gaby ha tomado clases de inglés en la biblioteca y gracias a eso ahora trabaja para Hacienda CDC.

Actualmente Gaby está volviendo a leer libros sobre masaje para bebés, preparándose para hacer algunos talleres sobre masajes y apego. Cuando le pregunté cuál fue su libro favorito de la infancia, Gaby dijo El Principito de Antoine Saint-Exupery. También disfruta de la poesía y los textos de Gabriel García-Márquez. Pero lo más importante para ella es el poema que dijo de memoria mientras estábamos sentadas en la biblioteca, porque refleja su propia experiencia y su profundo amor por los niños. El poema es “Tristitia” del gran poeta peruano de principios del siglo XX, Abraham Valdolemar. Las palabras la acompañaron durante toda su infancia y la ayudaron a cambiar su propia historia.

Pages

Subscribe to