MCL Blogs

The default blog for all Library Blog Posts.

Wheels and axles, screws, pulleys, inclined planes, levers and wedges.  Simple machines have been in use for millenia.  Over time, many famous people have been involved in their discovery, describing how they work, and developing them into more complicated machines that still help us get the job done.  Who were some of these people?

Archimedes

Archimedes was one of the first to document the properties of some of the simple machines.  Famous in the field of mathematics, he is considered the inventor of the Archimedes screw. He also did work on the mathematical properties of levers and pulleys.

Leonardo da VinciFilippo BrunelleschiGalileo Galilei

Who were others famous for experimenting with simple machines?  During the Renaissance, scientists and inventors really came into their own.  Using and combining simple machines in new and exciting ways was a trio of men from Italy:  Leonardo da Vinci, Filippo Brunelleschi, and Galileo Galilei

Leonardo was an artist, inventor, engineer who designed many machines that used or made simple machines.  Brunelleschi is best known for designing and building the Duomo in Florence, Italy  as well as the tools needed to move the building materials up to the dome.  Galileo is known for his many scientific discoveries, including the use of inclined planes to determine mathematically the properties of gravity and speed.

Want to learn more?  Come into a branch or contact a librarian and we'll be glad to help.

 

 

Over the next several weeks, we will be releasing a series of five short videos called Money Tip$.  The videos in this series are designed to provide quick tips for money-related topics such as credit, budgeting, saving, and setting SMART goals for managing your money.  With tax season in full bloom, the first installment outlines several ways to make the most of tax time.  This brief video will offer reminders about important tax credits, free tax preparation assistance, along with several ideas for using your income tax refund strategically to benefit you in the long run.  


The Money Tip$ video series was produced by Multnomah County Library in collaboration with Innovative Changes, a Portland non-profit organization that exists to help low-income individuals, families and others, manage short-term financial needs in order to achieve and maintain household stability.  Made possible by The Library Foundation with a grant from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation through Smart Investing @ your library ®, a partnership with the American Library Association


 

Holding HandsBecoming a caregiver is a life-changing event. Maybe it starts gradually, with a bit of household help now and again, or maybe it starts with the sudden shock of a phone call in the night. Whatever your situation, take heart in knowing that you are not alone. A wealth of resources is available to support you.

Multnomah County

When you don’t know where to turn first, the Multnomah County Aging & Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) Helpline is a good place to start. Information and assistance is available to seniors, people with disabilities, and caregivers 24 hours a day. Call 503-988-3646 Monday - Friday, 8am-5pm, to reach the most knowledgeable staff. Through this same number, you can contact the Family Caregiver Support Program, which offers services that can take some of the burden off unpaid caregivers.

Elders in Action is another great local resource. Through their Personal Advocate Services, trained volunteers help older adults and link individuals to community resources. They focus in the area of housing, healthcare, crime, and elder abuse. Personal Advocate volunteers assist older adults in Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington counties.

Oregon

The Aging and Disability Resource Connection is a resource directory for Oregon families, caregivers, and consumers seeking information about long-term support and services. Here you will find quick and easy access to information about resources in your community.

National

The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) knows that caregiving can be overwhelming. Through their Caregiving Resource Center, you can connect with caregiving resources both local and far away. Topics covered include Planning & Resources, Benefits & Insurance, Legal & Money Matters, Care for Yourself, Providing Care, Senior Housing, End-of-Life Care, and Grief & Loss. Caregiving Tools include a Care Provider Locator, a Long-Term Care Calculator, and even a Caregiving Glossary.

Caregivers for persons with Alzheimer’s and dementia face special challenges. The Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver’s Center can help arm you with the information you need to handle those challenges, whether you’re facing them now or need to be preparing for the future. Also through the Caregiver’s Center, you can locate local support groups, which can become an indispensable source of information and emotional support.

The Family Caregiver Alliance provides information on all aspects of caregiving, from public policy and research to practical tips on caregiving. Fact sheets on multiple issues are available in English, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

Caregiver’s Magazine is an online magazine for, about, and by caregivers. Here you will find first-hand stories of others’ caregiving journeys, as well as an online bookstore and tips on resources and strategies.

There are 65.7 million family caregivers in the US--29% of the adult population--and caregiving affects the whole family. The National Alliance for Caregiving is a non-profit coalition of over 50 national organizations focused on family caregiving. The organization identifies new trends and sheds light on the varying needs of caregivers nationwide.

Caregiving is challenging enough when Mom is next door. What if she’s in Chicago? Or Boston? Having an ally on the ground to help you assess the situation can be exactly the extra bit of assistance you need to make sure that all goes well. The National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers can help you locate a professional Geriatric Care Manager, a health and human services specialist who helps families who are caring for older relatives.

If you’re a primary caregiver, or if you’re coordinating care at a distance, no doubt you know what it’s like to feel as if you don’t have enough hands, or enough hours in the day, to do everything that needs to be done. Lotsa Helping Hands harnesses the power of community and links it through an online service to provide help when it’s needed. You can create your own community and ask for help, without having to make a dozen phone calls or feel that you’re putting friends on the spot.


Finally, don’t forget to take care of yourself! The stories of other caregivers and how they’ve handled their challenges may give you the ideas you need to take care of yourself.

Contributed by jennyw

Photo of Beverly Cleary from beverly cleary dot com

One of the most popular and honored authors of all time, Beverly Cleary has won the Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw. Her books Ramona Quimby, Age 8 plus Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books.

Beverly Cleary was born in McMinnville, Oregon, and, until she was old enough to attend school, lived on a farm in Yamhill, a town so small it had no library. Her mother arranged with the State Library to have books sent to Yamhill and acted as librarian in a lodge room upstairs over a bank. There Mrs. Cleary learned to love books. When the family moved to Portland, where Mrs. Cleary attended grammar school and high school, she soon found herself in the low reading circle, an experience that has given her sympathy for the problems of struggling readers. (1)

Celebrate Oregon's beloved author and famous characters from her novels with the self-guided walking tour Walking With Ramona Description  & Map, published by The Library Foundation. The tour begins at the Hollywood Neighborhood Library, 4040 N.E. Tillamook Street, and continues through nearby neighborhoods, exploring the places where the events in her books "really happened." Visit the Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden, a special gift to the City of Portland from Friends of Henry & Ramona. Cast in bronze by Portland artist Lee Hunt, the life-sized bronze statues of Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Henry's dog Ribsy welcome young and old to Grant Park.

Continue on through the park, scene of endless adventures: "He passed the playground where he heard the children's shouts and the clank and clang of the rings and swings. Henry didn't stop. He had work to do. He went to the edge of the park where there were no lights and turned on his flashlight. Sure enough, there in the grass under a bush was a night crawler. Henry nabbed it and put it into his jar."

Sculpture of Henry;  photo by Beverly Stafford, Multnomah County LibraryRamona sculpture - photo by Beverly Stafford Multnomah County LibraryRidby the dog sculpture - photo by Beverly Stafford, Multnomah County Library

We hope you enjoy this walking tour. Please be mindful of current residents as you pass by the homes where Beverly Cleary once lived.

Beverly Cleary now resides in California but her influence is always local for us.


Print: Walking With Ramona: 1. Description  2. Map    Copies available at the Hollywood Library

Sources:

  1. D.E.A.R. : Drop Everything and Read
  2. City of Portland: Grant Park Sculpture Garden. Dedicated on October 13, 1995.
  3. The publication Walking With Ramona was made possible by gifts to The Library Foundation.

 

Advertisement for Rummer Homes, Sunday Oregonian, 4/21/1963.When I saw that last Thursday’s episode of Think Out Loud featured a story Rummer homes -- distinctive mid-century modern houses built by local builder Robert Rummer in the 1960s -- I thought it was the perfect moment to highlight some resources for learning about modern residential classics like the Rummer homes.

So far as I’ve been able to discover, there aren’t any books devoted to Robert Rummer’s houses (maybe you should write one!).  But fans of Rummers have a virtual gathering place, the Rummer Network, home to all sorts of great stuff, including contemporary and historical photos of Rummer houses and some helpful links to information about Eichler houses (Eichlers are California ranch houses developed by Joseph Eichler -- they were the inspiration for Rummer houses).  And, there is an informative article about Rummer houses at the California-based Eichler Network website: “Meet Builder Robert Rummer,” by Joe Bartholow.

Modern Historic Resources of East Portland Of course, Robert Rummer wasn’t the only local builder who spent the post-war years specializing in a new, fresh approach to house design -- cleanly-designed, open architecture was popular everywhere.  To get a sense for the trends in modern house styles in mid-Multnomah County, take a look at the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability’s survey, Modern Historic Resources of East Portland (pdf, written for the City of Portland by Historic Preservation Northwest, Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, April 2011).  It focuses on buildings on the east side of 82nd Ave., where many 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s-era subdivisions are located.

Mid Century Home Style is another great source -- especially for mid-century house researchers seeking out primary documentation.  Among other things, the site collects house plan books which were originally published 1937-1963.  These plan books show illustrations of house facades, floor plans, and occasional interior or garden views.  Most are much less avant-garde than Rummer or Eichler houses: primarily these are plain ranch houses, designed for middle America; but nonetheless, many have quite a lot of space-age flair. 

And of course, the library has a lot of great books about the history of modern domestic architecture.  The list below should get you started!


Do you want to learn more about the history of your Portland-area modern house? The library's House history page has lots more resources to help you with your search -- but for specific advice or help with your research challenges, do please Ask the Librarian!


 

France’s various media outlets have developed free, fun, and accessible language learning resources. While they are generally designed to help immigrants in France, they are also a boon for those of us working on our French from far away!

For video lessons, check out Apprendre le français avec TV5MONDE. There you will find French lessons divided into four levels. Each lesson has recent news video with a series of questions or grammar exercises. Examples of recent video topics: Le lycée c'est fini!Les Tatars de Crimée, and L'histoire de la moutarde. Learn about culture, travel, news and more while improving your French!

Prefer audio lessons? Take a look at Radio France International’s Langue Français page, which has a huge array of lessons, many of them downloadable. If you like podcasts be sure to look for the link for Journal en français facile (iTunes), a daily news broadcast in simple French. The broadcasters speak slowly, provide context, and often have an explanation of an idiom. Even if you find yourself struggling to understand it is invaluable to hear the accent and the rhythm of the language without being completely overwhelmed.

And remember, at the library we have CDs & downloadable audio to help you learn French, and check out Mango!

Looking for more language learning resources? Ask us, we can help!

Ben Franklin spent his life asking questions, discovering answers, learning new things, and enjoying time with friends and family.

 

During his lifetime he was a printer, a writer, an inventor, a postmaster, a diplomat and is one of the best known Founding Fathers of America.

As a young man he opened his own print shop in Philadelphia. He printed many things, among them his own newspaper the Pennsylvania Gazette and Poor Richards Almanac.

 

Using the pen name Richard Saunders, Ben wrote and published Poor Richard's Almanack from 1733 to 1758. 
The most popular part of the almanacs were sayings and advice such as "Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise."
 
 
As Postmaster General he improved delivery times and was able to send all of his own mail for free.
 
Many of his inventions are still used today.
 
Without Ben's work as a diplomat to France, the United States may not have won the Revolutionary War. He spent a year negotiating with the French for arms, ammunition, and soldiers.
 
Ben played a vital role in the birth of our country. He helped write the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. He is the only person who signed all four of the founding documents, the Declaration of Independence (1776), the Treaty of Alliance, Amity, and Commerce with France (1778), the Treaty of Peace between England, France, and the United States (1782), and the U.S. Constitution.
 
If you want to know more about Ben Franklin, and have lots of time, watch the PBS documentary on his life and times. You can also contact a librarian.

What is my car worth now if I want to sell it?

I want to buy a used pickup truck. How can I find out what a fair price is?

What is the safest car for my teen to drive?

 

All of these questions and more can be answered with these online resources:

  • The Kelley Blue Book Online gives you timely and accurate prices on new and used cOld Red Truckars based on geography and condition. For most vehicles you can get a good idea of prices for buying a new or used car from a dealer or private seller and also what you can expect to sell one for to a dealer or private buyer.
  • The Car and Driver buyers' guide covers automobiles manufactured in the last two years and can be searched by manufacturer, vehicle type, price range and more.
  • Click and Clack, the comedic brothers from Car Talk, use down-to-earth humor to give you actual car information on buying, selling, and owning a car.
  • CarInfo features car information provided by consumer advocate & auto expert Mark Eskeldson. It includes car buying and leasing secrets, as well as information on used cars, car loans, and insurance.
  • Edmunds Automobile Buyer's Guide has used car prices back to 2000, safety information, and updates on new vehicles.
  • The US EPA Fuel Economy website allows you to compare gas mileage (MPG), greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution ratings, and safety information for new and used cars and trucks. There are also gas mileage tips, a page to search for the cheapest gas in your area, and a page of links to other sites about automobiles, safety, and the environment.
  • The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/Highway Loss Data Institute provides accident facts, results of crash tests, child safety and teen driving brochures, and news releases about safety for cars, drivers, and pedestrians.
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration maintains a website dedicated to safety. This resource has  information about recalls, crash tests, car seats, drunk driving, and pedestrian safety.
 

In addition to these online resources, the library also has the most current NADA Guides and Kelley Blue Book Guides in print at the information desk in each library location.  The Science and Business Desk at the Central Library even has the Kelley Blue Book guides going back to 1999 so you can see what your vehicle was worth in years past.

For a round up of car repair resources available at your library, see the blog post: Get Your Motor Running: This car isn’t going to fix itself.

Buying or selling an automobile can be a complicated process!  If you do not see the resource you need here to answer your questions, please Ask a Librarian.  We will help you connect to the information you seek!  

 

 

Terry Baxter, Archivist, Multnomah County Archives (photo by Giles Clement)Our guest blogger is Terry. Terry has worked as an archivist for 28 years, the last 15 with the Multnomah County Archives, and currently serves on the Society of American Archivists Council. He is also a proud card-carrying library user who empties the system of poetry and cookbooks on a regular basis.

Multnomah County is going to be 160 years old this year.  While no one is old enough (as far as we know, anyway) to remember those sixteen decades of history, there is a place where those stories are kept. The Multnomah County Archives, in the shadow of Mt. Hood and nestled between a gravel pit and a landfill, has been collecting, preserving, and providing access to the archives of Multnomah County government for 12 years.

Archives are the official records, usually unique and created to document actions and not as a purposeful historical narrative, of an organization preserved indefinitely because of their long-term research value.   In the case of the County Archives, this means records of the activities of Multnomah County’s government agencies. “How boring is THAT?” I can hear you saying right now.  

Map of the Multnomah County Poor Farm, 1938Well, maybe you’d like to see and read about the origins of McMenamins Edgefield as the County Poor Farm. Or watch a film of the 1948 flood that destroyed the second largest city in Oregon, Vanport.  Or see the plans for a professional baseball and football stadium in Delta Park. These and thousands of other records, documenting all aspects of the county and its interactions with its residents from 1854 on, are preserved by archivists for anyone to view and use. Archives have all sorts of tales to tell us about our individual and common pasts, about each other, and about ourselves.

1948 flood that destroyed Vanport, OregonArchivists love to connect people with these stories. Stereotypical views depict archivists as introverted Jocasta Nu’s, hiding in basements, hoarding piles of dusty files. If this was ever accurate, it certainly isn’t now (except the basement part!). Archivists are deeply concerned about context and connection. They locate and describe records and how they relate to the organizations that created them and then work to make those records as accessible as possible to as many people as possible. An archivist’s happiest moment comes when a person’s face lights up after finding something deeply meaningful in the archives.

Proposed stadium in Delta Park in the early 1960sArchivists are also collaborators who know they usually don’t have all the information in their archives that a person needs. There are a number of archives in Multnomah County (and across the rest of the world).  Many residents of Multnomah County are familiar with downtown Portland’s “History Row. ” Located within a short walk of each other on the south park blocks are the Oregon Historical Society, the Portland State University Archives, the Portland Archives and Records Center, and “Portland’s Crown Jewel” – Central Library and its wondrous John Wilson Special Collections.

So come visit, meet an archivist, and let the stories you find connect you to the voices, past and present, of others who have inhabited our county.

Contact:

Terry Baxter, archivist
Multnomah County Archives
1620 SE 190th Avenue
Portland, OR 97233
503.988.3741

Located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in present-day Iraq, the cultures of ancient Mesopotamia made remarkable achievements in writing, art, and agriculture. Image of ziggurat

This National Geographic video provides a short introduction. For older students, here’s a John Green Crash Course video with more details. You may also like this interactive map, which shows how Mesopotamian culture developed.

The University of Chicago has an amazing collection of artifacts from ancient Mesopotamia, and at their website, you can examine them in depth, learn about what daily life was like, listen to interviews with archaeologists, or even go on a virtual archaeological dig.

At the British Museum’s Mesopotamia site, you can find maps and information about the writing, mythology, buildings, and astronomers from various Mesopotamian cultures.

Ancient Mesopotamia covers geography, religion, economics, clothing, and the achievements of Mesopotamian cultures.

Several different empires existed in region of Mesopotamia, including the Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians. The Sumerians were known for inventing cuneiform writing. You can see what your monogram would look like in this writing system. They also wrote the first superhero story, the Epic of Gilgamesh, and played board games. One Babylonian ruler is famous for creating Hammurabi’s Code, a collection of laws. Ziggurats, large step pyramids like the one shown in the photo, were built by the Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians.

If you didn’t find the information that you need, please contact a librarian for more assistance.

Ah the stories of King Arthur and his knights, the cute thatched cottages, the banquets, the country life, and the bustle of growing cities!  What’s not to like about the Middle Ages and Medieval period in history?  Well, the smell for one.  And let’s not forget the plague. Get all the dirt on what life was really like in Europe during this time.

picture of knightsStart at the Annenberg Learner Middle Ages site for loads of info on everyday life in medieval times including the feudal system, religion, clothes, the arts and more.  This includes movies and other cool interactive stuff.  After you click on the link, scroll to the right to get the content!

 Click on the different people in the street in the Camelot International Village to learn more about their craft or trade and how they lived in the Middle Ages. Find out about entertainers, peasants, traders, thieves, knights, church and religion, women, and lords of the manor.

For a funny and informative video series about the Middle Ages, watch Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives.  Each 30 minute episode examines a different type of person important during the time period like kings, knights, monks and damsels.picture of a king's seal

For a video and interactive introduction to medieval life, watch Everyday Life in the Middle Ages and see if you could survive way back in the day!

The Internet Medieval Sourcebook is super boring to look at, but amazing in its amount of primary source material (letters, legal texts, religious documents etc.).  It’s a comprehensive collection of online texts from the entire medieval era, organized by topic and chronologically.

Now that you’ve learned a lot about the Middle Ages, test your knowledge here.

If you're in the middle of one, the phrase "healthy breakup" may sound like some kind of sad joke. But whether you're breaking things off or you've just been broken up with, you can make the breakup more bearable.

If you feel like your relationship is unhealthy and you're trying to decide whether to break up, check out Love Is Respect's "Should We Break Up?"

Rookie Magazine has some great advice: "Making A Clean Breakup" makes the point that "breaking up with someone can be just as painful, if not more so, than being the one who’s left behind." "Cures for Love" explains how to "beast through the aching immobility of heartbreak by conducting specific rituals, exercises, and experiments."

Oakland artist Jess Wheelock drew a comic that helps explain what the brain goes through during a breakup.

And there's no subsitute for connecting with others who've been through the same thing, so register for the first annual Healthy Breakup Summit, which will be:

Thursday April 24th, 2014
5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
5135 NE Columbia Blvd Portland, OR 97218
 
 
·         Dynamics of break ups and tools to build healthy relationships
·         Specialized activities for youth of all ages (0-24), parents/guardians and Elders
·         Two-Spirit and LGBTQ Perspectives of break-ups/relationships
·         Building communication skills to navigate relationships
 
For more information please contact:
Brighton, Native American Youth & Family Center: brightonk@nayapdx.org; Office 503-288-8177 x220
Erin, Native American Youth & Family Center: erinh@nayapdx.org; Office 503-288-8177 x316
Lesley, VOA HomeFree: lramos@voaor.org; Office (503) 988-6475, Cell (503) 473-7396
 

Whatever Needs to Be Done

Picture of Sachiko Vidourek

by Mindy Moreland

“Quietly doing tremendous good” is a fitting description of Library Outreach Services, which brings library service to our community’s homebound, homeless, and incarcerated populations. Sachiko Vidourek is one of many volunteers helping this department to thrive; her dedication and flexibility have made her a valued part of the LOS team. Sachiko works with the adult literacy coordinator and the library outreach specialists, with a job description that could read  “whatever needs to be done.” Each week she performs tasks ranging from data entry and preparing materials for citizenship classes to shelving materials and labeling shelves. Sachiko also helps the staff with more abstract problems, brainstorming issues of process, organization, and programming. “Sometimes I might suggest something ridiculous, but it gives a different perspective,” Sachiko says with a warm smile. “When someone has an idea, even if it’s the wrong idea it helps give clarity to the problem.”

 

"If I was a librarian, I'd want to work for LOS."

Sachiko has been drawn to libraries since she was a child. Growing up in Ohio, she used to walk three and a half blocks (an epic journey at the time, she recalls) to visit the local library, where she participated in Summer Reading and was fascinated by the pre-digital checkout machines. As an art history student in college she loved spending time in the cozy art and architecture library, and even considered a career as a librarian. Today she manages the gourmet chocolate shop Cacao, and enjoys the serenity of her volunteer hours in the Library Outreach as a respite from her bustling customer service job. She takes great satisfaction, she says, in the balance of the concrete progress and philosophical problem-solving that volunteering at the library affords. Perhaps most importantly, she adores working with the LOS team, who she describes as quirky, fun, and deeply dedicated to the amazing work they quietly do. “I feel really appreciated there,” she says fondly. “If I was a librarian, I’d want to work for LOS.”

 

A Few Facts About Sachiko

Home library: Hillsdale Library

Currently reading: Technically I'm in between books. I just finished The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. A good friend gave me Neil Gaiman's Ocean at the End of the Lane for Christmas, and I think that's next. But I also have in-hand-and-waiting Lost Japan (Alex Kerr) and the start of the latest series by Jacquline Carey. I find that my list of books to explore grows faster than I can read, and I often get sidetracked on my way to a particular book.

Most influential book: Books by Alistair MacLean shaped me the most growing up in middle school. Also influential was Setting the Table (Danny Meyers) which sounds like a cooking book but is really about hospitality. Others titles include Lessons in Service from Charlie Trotter (Edmund Lawler) and Joy of Cooking (Irma Rombauer et al.).

Favorite book from childhood: Only one?! I loved Dr. Seuss, Encyclopedia Brown (Donald J. Sobol), and Key to the Treasure (Peggy Parrish), but what I still have on my shelves as an adult are The King and His Friends (Jose Aruego), Max (Rachel Isadora), and A Pair of Red Clogs (Masako Matsuno). Just couldn't give 'em up.

A book that made you laugh or cry: Press Here (Herve Tullet), The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (Sherman Alexie) and Dog Heaven (Cynthia Rylant)

Favorite section of the library: Usually Young Adult

E-reader or paper book? Paper, paper, paper! (But I might say e-reader later when I need bigger fonts and my glasses aren't enough.)

Favorite guilty reading pleasure: Jacqueline Carey & fantasy in general

Favorite place to read: On the couch with the dog!

See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

The ancient Egyptians get all the credit for pyramids, but they weren't the only ones building these massive structures. Not only did pyramids appear in neighboring areas of Africa, but halfway around the world, the Maya and Aztecs, along with the Toltecs, built stepped pyramids. These pyramids of Mexico and Central America were often used as foundations for temples. This meant they usually had flat tops instead of the pointy Egyptian style. Built at different times thousands of miles from each other, the pyramids of the Old and New Worlds still have some similarites.

infographic of Egyptian and Latin American pyramids

Check out this New Book of Knowledge article for more information about pyramids or try some of the books below. If you want or need any more help, ask a librarian!

I recently had the pleasure of seeing Troy the Musical! put on by the Odyssey Program at PPS’s Hayhurst School. There were laughs aplenty as we were taken through a musical romp starting with the tale of that trickster Eris, goddess of strife, and the Apple of Discord through to demise of Troy with that pesky Trojan Horse. It was a much livelier version than the somber, yet stunning, 1971 classic The Trojan Women.

Though it had plenty of romance, a little less heated than the the 1956 Helen of Troy.

My curiosity piqued I had to some more digging (pun included) with the great archeology information found at University of Cincinnati's Center for the Electronic Reconstruction of Historical and Archaeological Sites and the Troia Projekt of the University of Tübingen, Germany. Most of our written history about siege of Troy comes from Homer’s The Illiad, but that often reads more as fiction with the Grecian Gods often stepping in and taking an active role. The Greeks were often at war, but for the Trojans thia war was epic, and historians tell us how it lasted for over ten years.

The students at Odyssey should be very proud of themselves, for their great singing, comedic timing, and the ability to dance in flippers. Thanks for the glitter, laughs and bringing Homer’s story to life.

 

Lewis and Clark traveled to the Pacific Ocean and back using a variety of water vessels. Until they crossed the Rocky Mountains all water travel was against the current and hard work! The rest of their journey was on foot and horseback. The total number of miles there and back was between seven and eight thousand.

The expedition began with a keelboat, a pirogue and canoe. Eventually the keelboat was sent back to President Jefferson packed with written reports, Native American artifacts, plant and animal specimens, minerals, four live magpies, a prairie dog and a grouse.

Image Keelboat Cabin

Over the course of the expedition they paddled about 15 canoes, most made themselves, using tools they brought along. They carved the canoes very slowly by hand until the Shoshoni Indians taught them how to burn out the logs. An incredibly challenging leg of their journey occurred at the Great Falls in Montana when the Corps climbed out of their canoes and had to portage around this magnificent natural obstacle.

Image Great Falls PortageImage of PortageImage of Great Falls in Montana

When the Missouri River could no longer be navigated their plan was to switch to horseback. They hoped to purchase horses from the Shoshoni to cross the Bitterroot Mountains. Although there was already snow in the mountains, the Corps decided to keep going and consequently, this is probably the closest they came to losing their lives. They arrived in Nez Perce country sick and starving. 

The fabulous finale to the expedition's trek to the Pacific was an exciting ride down the Columbia River. After wintering at Fort Clatsop in Oregon, the Corps re-traced their steps, with a few changes, back to where they began their journey. Check out this detailed timeline listing what form of transportation was used at each place on the Lewis and Clark trail.

When John Marshall discovered gold on the American River in 1848, he tried to keep it a secret.   California was still a territory with a population of about  157,000 and he knew if word got out about the discovery of gold, it would change everything.

The secret proved impossible to keep and  “gold fever” started the  biggest migration in U.S. history. Just a few years later more than 300,000 people moved to California with hopes of striking it rich,  fast-tracking the territory to statehood. Take a look at the maps, letters and images from this remarkable time.

Most of  miners were American, but news of the discovery spread around the world. People came from Europe, Australia, China and Latin America, creating one of the first multi-ethnic workforces in the world.   Experience the Gold Rush from a variety of perspectives with this game.

Miners from different backgrounds working side by side.

Though miners discovered more than 750,000 pounds of gold between 1848 and 1853, more business entrepreneurs than miners struck it rich!

For more information on the California Gold Rush,  just ask a librarian!

Are you trying to understand how maps work? Or maybe you need to find one for a school project? If so, this post will get you pointed in the right direction!

Maps Maps Maps is a great video introduction to the different types of maps, the symbols found on them, and latitude and longitude.Image of map

Have you ever looked at all those funny symbols on a map and wondered what they represent? Reading a Map is an activity that explains topographic maps, including legends (which describe the symbols on a map), and scale. Or at Adventure Island, you can practice finding items from the legend on the map.

What does Never Eat Soggy Waffles mean? It’s a phrase to help you remember the cardinal directions (north, east, south and west). Try this activity to help you master them.

If you need a map to use in a project, try National Geographic Map Maker One-Page Maps. Choose a country, check the items you’d like included on the map, and print! If you’re feeling a bit more creative, try Map Maker Interactive, where you can make a map of your very own. Choose to include features like climate zones, population density, or even volcanic eruptions! For maps of regions or entire continents, try the World Factbook.

The Lands and Peoples encyclopedia includes an electronic atlas with many kinds of specialized maps. You can find historical maps (on topics such as ancient cultures or U.S. expansion), exploration routes, time zones, and climate data. If you aren’t at the Multnomah County Library, you’ll need to log in to the encyclopedia with your library card number and PIN.

Still lost and in need of direction? Trying contacting a librarian for more help!

Artists in grades 6-12, two great opportunities! 

art by Carrie Anne Jones

Enter the Teen Summer Reading Gameboard design contest:

art by Carrie Anne Jones

Submit your work for the Teen Art Show sponsored by the Northwest Library Teen Council:

  • Any two-dimensional medium
  • No larger than 28" x 30"
  • Must be matted or ok to pin to wall
  • Deliver to Northwest Library by March 31, pick up after April 29
  • Questions? Contact Susan: 503.988.5560 or susansm@multcolib.org

 

 

Do people cause climate change? How will it affect us as we grow up? Here are three informative websites for students that explain the basics of climate change. They can serve as a starting point for your report and answer other questions you have.

First we have a site from NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Climate Kids. This site answers some of the big questions about climate, such as "how do we know?" and "what is the greenhouse effect?" There are also games to play and things to make, if you want to have fun.

The Environmental Protection Agency's A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change is full of information about the effect of climate change on the environment. Learn the basics, see the impacts, and begin to think like a scientist at this well organized site. It includes thoughtful answers to frequently asked questions, such as "Is climate change the same thing as global warming?" The video above was produced by the EPA to explain the basics of climate change.

The most scientific of these sites, Spark Science Education, has a wealth of information, and comes from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The focus is mainly on atmospheric issues. This site includes a section on climate change activites, to explore projects and data about climate change.

The library also has online resources and encyclopedias to help with your report. Look up "climate change" on Grolier Online, with material for students of all ages. You will need your library card number and PIN to use this resource from home or school.

Want to learn more? Ask a librarian online or at your nearby library.

 

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