An Embarrassment of Riches

An Embarrassment of Riches is a blog about the best the library has to offer. From audio books to movies, from novels to zines, library staff and guest bloggers will tell you about their latest library discoveries. Read. Watch. Listen. Chat.

Guild Theater - Portland photoWhen you’re driving through the country, do you wonder what’s inside that neglected barn leaning in the distance? When you see a derelict car do you slow down and try to figure out the year, make and model? When passing through the “bad part of town” do you long to go into a boarded up movie theater that still advertises “This year’s Best Picture winner, D ncing wi h Wo ves” on the marquee?

If you answered yes to any of the above, then urban exploration—the act of visiting abandoned man-made places to document the experience—might be something you’d enjoy. Even though they may be called “urban explorers,” as you can see from this example, many of the places they visit may not be in a city. Man-made structures and artifacts are everywhere and have been abandoned everywhere.Ruined Buick photo

There are some theories out there about why people are drawn to abandoned places, but I don’t know if I’m self-aware enough to pick any one reason that explains my own fascination. In the United States, Detroit has become the poster child for urban decay, but it certainly isn’t alone. Urban explorers have an entire globe to discover and there is an active web presence for those who are interested. It isn’t for everyone, however. These are dangerous places, for many reasons.

Maybe running a gauntlet of armed guards or crawling through a dank ruined building full of bugs and asbestos isn’t appealing. Fortunately, there are those who are not only interested in that sort of adventure but also want to share, so you can vicariously enjoy man-made ruins by visiting the library and checking out one of the great books on this list.

The Portable Veblen bookjacketLooking for a bit of quirkiness in your books? Here’s a delightful story I zipped through recently.

The Portable Veblen, by Elizabeth McKenzie, tells a story that includes the economist who coined the term “conspicuous consumption”; a big, bad pharmaceutical company; the department of defense; hippie parents; the upcoming marriage of a neurologist who has invented a tool to cut a perfect circle in skulls of soldiers with brain injuries and a translator for the Norwegian Diaspora; and a squirrel. It’s funny and sweet and endearing, just a tad on the experimental side with unique little illustrations sprinkled throughout. The book and its main character, Veblen Amundsen-Hovda, are wonderfully quirky and ultimately quite wise. I laughed, learned new words, and thoroughly enjoyed The Portable Veblen.

If you’d like a bit more unconventionality and eccentricity in your reading, try one of the books on my list here.

Outside of my undying love for various teen idols, I never had much romance in my life in my tween and teen years.  Sure, there were a few flirtations, crushes and dates, and one memorable mad kissing session with a Danish exchange student at a party my parents STILL don’t know about, but I didn’t have a serious boyfriend until my early twenties. Most of my romance back then had to come from books.  Today there is no shortage of romance in books for teens.  Read on to find out about my current favorites just in time for Valentine’s Day.

Isla and the Happily Ever After book jacketIsla is in her senior year at the School of America in Paris and finally has gotten together with Josh, the boy she’s been crushing on for three years.  He’s sexy!  He’s an artist!  He’s crazy about her!  He gets expelled!  Well, the last part isn't so great.  In fact it’s downright depressing.  What’s a girl to do?  Read her story in Isla and the Happily Ever After by Stephanie Perkins.

I love "boys in love" books. You get to see what guys are actually thinking about girls, because sometimes you just gotta ask them “What were you thinking?” Six Impossible Things book jacketDan Cereill (that’s pronounced “surreal” NOT “cereal”) has had a pretty cruddy time lately, but has set himself quite an agenda that might just take his mind off the fact that his dad just trashed the family business and then came out.  In fact, his to-do list is made up of six pretty impossible things, the first being to kiss Estelle, the gorgeous girl next door who, basically, doesn’t know he exists.  One day he sneaks into her attic lair and reads her diary, and that just sets him up for some pretty rough going.  What was he thinking? Find out in Six Impossible Things by Fiona Wood.

The Heir and the Spare book jacketWhen Evie heads off to the University of Oxford, one of the first people she meets is Edmund, the second in line to the throne, and therefore the “spare heir”.  Evie immediately falls in love with him, but a romantic relationship seems impossible.  She’s American, she’s not part of the aristocracy, and Edmund has a rich girl who is hanging all over him.  Edmund is giving Evie some positive signals though, and then she discovers a family secret that might change everything.  Will she ever get her prince?  Does he even deserve her? The Heir and the Spare by Emily Albright.

For more romance featuring teens, swoon over this list.

Are you a creative person who sometimes struggles with getting things done? Need some inspiration, or just another excuse to procrastinate? Here are 5 podcasts to prime your creative pump.

Michael Ian Black is best known as a comedian, but he's also an incredibly fine interviewer. In How to Be Amazing he talks to exceptional people about how they succeeded, how they've failed, and what they did about it. There are interviews with Baratunde Thurston, Amy Schumer and Nate Sliver, but perhaps the most revealing is with David Sedaris, who reveals a weird pastime and how much he earns. How much? You'll have to listen to find out.

Nora Young and the folks at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation explore new ideas in the world of technology on Spark. You'll be thinking, "I wish I had invented that!"

 

If you're looking for science-based inspiration, look no further than PRI's Science + Creativity where they explore mind-blowing topics like microbal video games, Occulus Rift, and cybernetic art.

 

 

 

 

Brian E. Young is a kind and encouraging voice, and he directs his comments especially to artists and designers in his podcast Uncanny Creativity.

 

 

Todd Henry's The Accidental Creative is all about process. He offers practical advice on implementing your best ideas, gaining traction, and conveying value.

 

Happy creating, and happy listening!

 

Theodore Roosevelt wasn't just a president, he was also an explorer. Read about his harrowing journey down a tributary of the Amazon in Candice Millard's The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey.

Maile Meloy's The Apothecary combines the tension of cold war politics with science, and magic. It's a great read for teens and adults. What's not to love?

The Book of Jhereg book jacketWhile I have absolutely no interest in meeting in real life a professional assassin that runs a protection racket, drug dealers, prostitutes and fences as a mid-level crime boss, I don’t mind coming across one in books.  There’s an old favorite series of mine by Steven Brust that has just such a character. Vlad Taltos is an unrepentant criminal. What the character has going for him is a witty observation of the world around him that reminds me a lot of my favorite series and character Harry Dresden in the Dresden Files

Vlad Taltos is a human, or as the local inhabitants of his home city prefer, an "Easterner".  He lives in a vast fantasy city peopled by Dragaerans who are all taller, stronger, much longer lived and more magically inclined than humans. The Dragaerans divide themselves into 17 houses, each with their own set of talents and traits. Mixing bloodlines between the clannish houses is nearly taboo.  The only house that will take mixed house members in is the Jhereg.  The Jhereg will sell anything to anyone without scruple including a minor title to a social-climbing Easterner. Vlad finds he has a talent for beating up Dragaerans and decides it suits him much better than working in his father's little restaurant paying protection to the nearest Jhereg thug.  Better to claw his way up to neighborhood boss himself!   The first three books by Steven Brust about Vlad can be found in The Book of Jhereg. As all the titles are based on made up animal names and the series is very long, I recommend checking Novelist Plus for series order.

If swords suit you better than a scoundrel, I also have loved the Tiger and Del books by Jennifer Roberson for years.  This series being from the 1980s it The Novels of Tiger and Del book jacketincludes a common trope in fantasy at the time of having the heroine be the one and only woman warrior in a men's world.  In these books, a lot of these characters felt not very female, but Roberson’s novels are an exception.  The characters also age and change as the series matures with time. I like my novels character driven and Tiger and Del are interesting, well-developed characters throughout. The first two books can be found in The Novels of Tiger and Del Volume 1. Again, check Novelist Plus to get the books in the right order.

Some final words in favor of these books: I have room on my personal shelves for no more than 2000 books and I usually have hundreds less than that.  I've held onto these complete series since 1983 and 1986 because they're good enough to rate keeping for decades.  Even though you can see the decades on the first book in their stylistic choices (and I've gone from seeing them with a child's eyes to an adult's perspective), the interesting characters and the authors growing and changing their writing style as the decades pass by make these both fantasy classics in my books.

"Remarkable events often have ordinary beginnings. Never was this more true than with my talks with Dean Spanley."

The movie Dean Spanley is a tale of forgiveness, transcendence and reconciliation. Every Thursday, Henslowe Fisk makes his way through the streets of London to visit his curmudgeonly, nihilistic father. The elder Fiske grumbles that his son's visits are a burden, and that the only thing special about a Thursday is to keep "Wednesday and Friday from colliding."

Fisk wonders whether the time couldn't be spent in more enjoyable pursuits. At his next visit he insists that he and his father attend a lecture on reincarnation, held by a guru on his vast estate. The senior Fisk is skeptical: "Do you think if we had souls, they wouldn't get in touch? Of course they would!"

While at the lecture they meet a local vicar, Dean Spanley. He's an odd character who makes some intriguing comments about the afterlife. Henslowe's curiosity prompts him to invite Spanley to dinner. He discovers that, plied with the right amount of wine, the Dean is given to telling fantastic stories of another, half-remembered life. After recounting one such tale, Spanley pauses to reflect, "One moment you are running along, the next you are no more." As time goes by, Henslowe realizes that these stories sound vaguely familiar, and may hold the key to a more enlightened relationship between Henslowe and his father.

The role of the elder Fisk is given Scrooge-like depth by Peter O'Toole, a valid reason on its own to watch this gem. Sam Neill's portrayal of the Dean is by turns hilarious and moving. Add wonderful dialog and the gorgeous Edwardian setting, and you'll find a movie that bears repeated watching. You'll have plenty of time to do so, if, as the guru insists, "You are, my dear sir, in the anteroom of eternity."

Hello. My name is Matt and I read mysteries.  

I never thought I’d be a mystery reader. It started off with the occasional Agatha Christie title to mix things up. A few years later,  I found myself reading a too cozy for comfort title involving a doughnut shop and recipes.  Things had gone too far. What kind of mystery reader was I? Was I one book away from entering the soft boiled world of J.B. Fletcher?

Luckily, the answer was right in front of me: gay detective novels.  In a literary world with limited LGBTQ characters, it’s exciting to find a likeable protagonist to identify with. Exploring the cast of gay detectives, I was surprised to find a collection of gentlemen larger than expected.

amuse bouche cover

Russell Quant is an everyman living in Saskatchewan. As a handsome rookie private detective in a small city, business can be slow. However, when it gets busy things quickly get out of hand.  His cases take him to exotic locales and always lead back to his Canadian home for a thrilling finale.  His love life is, uh, complicated and has it’s ups and downs.  A quirky cast of friends and family round out the series to keep things interesting.  Start with Amuse Bouche.

book cover rust on razorWhat do Scott, a famous baseball pitcher and Tom, a dedicated school teacher have in common? For starters, a penchant for getting in over their heads when mystery comes a calling. The heart of these books is dark, gritty, and reflective of the era in which each of them is written. The series spans twenty years of great change within the LGBTQ community and doesn’t hold back.  Are there schmaltzty moments?  Sure, but reluctant detectives need love too.  Start with “A Simple Suburban Murder” via Interlibrary loan or “Rust on the Razor” available at Multnomah County Library.

These are my favorites of the bunch, but check any of them out.  Each of these mystery series have their own feel.  It’s what makes the genre so much fun to read.  Plus you never know if the perfect pie recipe is on the next page...

Soon after I moved to Portland in the mid-’90s, I was delighted to find myself living downstairs from one of my best friends from college. I’d bum smokes and we’d talk about our lives on our shared front porch and make each other laugh. I wasn’t laughing, though, when he told me one night that he frequently got stopped by police right in our neighborhood, for just being there. For walking down his own street-- because my friend was black. His words removed the veil, at least partially, from my eyes. I loved Portland. I still love Portland, with all the zeal of a transplant from an East Coast city. But my unalloyed love of my new city was possible partly because of my white privilege.

As I listened to the audiobook of Ta-Nahesi Coates Between the World and Me, I heard a vivid and very beautifully written description of what it's like to live in the world without that privilege, and especially, what it’s like to have a child who lives without it. The book takes the form of a letter written from the author to his son, a powerful choice, especially for a listener who happens to be a parent.

As my kids get older, I let them go off and explore the world on their own, and I calm my fears by telling myself that people are more likely to be kind and helpful than cruel and violent. When I hear news of terrible events, part of me is always surprised. How can this be? The world is such a benevolent place- to me.

Black, white or whatever, you should read this book if you’re an American.

If you’re looking for more excellent audiobooks read by their own authors, investigate this list.

Nick Bruel is an author, illustrator and cartoonist, and is known for his series of children's books, Bad Kitty. In his spare time, he collects PEZ dispensers and hangs out with his wife and his cat, Esmerelda.

Nick Bruel photo[Scene: In front of the mirror, above the sink of a bathroom somewhere in Briarcliff Manor, NY]

Nick: The time is 5:13 am.  I’m standing here inside the downstairs bathroom of Nick Bruel, the world renowned children’s book author and illustrator, parkour master, Amway representative, and long standing member of the Flat Earth Society.  Good morning, Nick. Thank you for joining me here today.

Nick: You’re welcome.  I think.  Why am I here?

Nick: I’ve been tasked today to interview you to find out some of your favorite things…

Nick: Like what?  Ice cream?

Nick: Well, no, not precisely …

Nick: I like rum raisin. Haagen Dazs Rum Raisin ice cream. That’s my favorite.  Done?

Nick: No, not done. I was thinking more along the lines of … wait. You like rum raisin?  No one likes rum raisin.

Nick: I like rum raisin.

Nick: Since when?

Nick: Since always. It’s delicious, and I don’t have to defend myself. Are we done?

Nick: No! We’ve been tasked by the Multnomah County Library system in Portland to find out how you operate, to learn more about you by learning your favorite media.

Nick: Portland, Maine or Portland, Oregon?

Nick: Oregon.

Nick: Which is the one with all the street poetry, kombucha bars, and man buns?

Nick: Oregon.

[What follows is a long, uncomfortable silence.]

Nick: Sigh. Fine.

Nick: So, let’s start with your favorite movie.

Nick: My favorite movie of all time is a little known short film from Estonia called Man With A Broken Rainbow Of Love by the great director … excuse me … auteur Miloslav Krizkovenszvynzvz.  It tells the story of a poor but rich-in-spirit doorknob salesman who’s raising a family of marmosets in his garage while quietly succumbing to the ravages of an earlobe fungus over the course of 3 hours.  It’s an allegory of Stalinist Russia.

Nick: 3 hours?! I thought you said it was a short film?

Nick: The director’s cut takes 4 days to watch.

Nick: Well, actually, the library wants material that can be found in their collection.

Nick: Why?

Nick: Because this way people who read this can get to know you better while also promoting the library’s collection.

Nick: I see. So when people check out the same things I like from the library, they can feel like they’re ME?

Nick: Sort of.

Nick: They can pretend like they’re ME? The people of Oregon can go to the library and pretend to be Nick Bruel! That is beautiful. Just beautiful. Sniff.

Nick: Are … are you crying?

Nick: No. Shut up. I’m not crying. You’re crying!

[Audible scratching at the door]

Esmerelda: Meow?!  Meow?!

Nick: GO AWAY, ESME! I’m conducting an important interview! 

Esmerelda: Meow?!

Nick: No, you can’t use your litterbox now! I told you that I’m conducting an important interview! Go poop in the recycling or something!

Esmerelda: Hiss!

Nick: I HEARD THAT!  Where were we? Oh, right. Uh … so can you name a more conventional movie that you like?

Nick: Does the library have the films of Buster Keaton?

Nick: I’ll check. [Looks intensely at toothpaste tube] Yes!

Nick: Without a doubt, Buster Keaton was the first true master of comedy. I love Chaplin, but Buster Keaton’s work best exemplified how comedy and timing work hand in hand. He might be best known for his stunts, but Keaton’s true genius was in how he set up his jokes visually. To this day, there are film directors who borrow from Keaton and his visual style.

The General is considered his greatest film, but for anyone who needs an introduction to the great man, I would suggest starting with either College or Steamboat Bill, Jr. You can’t go wrong.

Nick: Okay! Great! Let’s move on to favorite music.

Nick: I like anything with cannons in it.

Nick: Cannons?

Nick: Sure. Cannons.

Nick: What music has cannons in it?

Nick: What music … are you kidding me?!  Haven’t you ever heard the 1812 Overture by Peter Tchaikavsky, you peasant?!

Nick: Oh, well, sure …

Nick: I’ll have you know that before degrading myself to this whole children’s book thing I do now, I had a promising career in place as a classical cannon player. I even studied at The Sarasota Online Cannon Conservatory And Clown College, which everyone knows has the most rigorous cannon certification process in the entire country! Even better than Yale’s!

Nick: Well, of course. Everyone knows that …

Nick: And I’d be playing the cannons to this day if not for that terrible day 12 years ago when I burnt my hand lighting the wick during rehearsals. Sniff. Sniff. My doctor says … sob … I’ll never be able to light another cannon wick again.

[Audible scratching at the door.]

Esmerelda: Meow?!

Nick: NOT NOW, ESME! I’M BUSY! JUST CROSS YOUR LEGS AND THINK OF THE DESERT!

Where were we?

Nick: Ummm … favorite book?

Nick: Well, I’m quite fond of the work of a blind, Inuit hermaphrodite named J.D. Salinger who …

Nick: Hang on!  J.D. Salinger was not a blind, Inuit hermaphrodite!

Nick: He wasn’t?

Nick: No. I understand that his eyesight was quite good.

Nick: My bad. Well, in any case, I’ve always liked how Salinger focuses on character development above all else.  I don’t think anyone can turn words on paper into the life story of a friend you grew up with like Salinger, and nothing exemplifies this better than 9 Stories, a collection of short stories he published in The New Yorker. A standout in this collection is “The Laughing Man” which tells the tale of a youth sports club bus driver from the point of view of one of his riders. It’s an amazing, multi-layered tale of friendship, young love, adventure, and the power of a creative spirit.  I read this book about once every 3-4 years to remind myself of what good writing looks like.

Nick: Never heard of it.

Nick: Well you should read it.

Nick: Maybe I will.  What about picture books?  Got a favorite picture book?

Nick: The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein.  To me, it’s one of those rare books that transcends its purpose as a book.  It’s message of unconditional generosity is so important that I’ve held a theory … a belief, really … for a while now that if every single person on the planet Earth read “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein, then there would be no war. It’s a theory that can never be prove, much less tested, but I stick to it anyway.

Nick: A lot of people don’t like this book. They think the tree is acting too much like a martyr and that the boy does nothing more than take advantage of him.

Nick: Yeah, well some people can go suck eggs. If you step back for a moment and just contemplate that this is a story about what it means to be a parent to a child who you love unconditionally, then the message becomes more clear. I can back this up, because I knew Shel Silverstein and once had a conversation with him on this very topic. He told me that of course this book was about parenting and that he loved watching people practically lose their minds over this book of his.

Nick: Did Shel Silverstein think people should go suck eggs over it?

Nick: No. But he was thinking it.

Nick: Well, Nick, I think that about wraps things up. I’d like to thank you for joining me here today.

Nick: It was my pleasure.

Nick: No, no! The pleasure was all mine!

Nick: Oh, well if you insist!

Nick: Ha, ha!

Nick: Ha, ha, ha!

[Audible scratching at door.]

Esmerelda:  MEOW!!  MEOW!!

Nick: OKAY! OKAY!  I’m opening the door! Jeez! Just light a match or something when you’re done this time. Sometimes I think you’re made out of eggs.

Falling in Love with Hominids book jacketSome writing just speaks to you. You relate to a situation, you long to experience a setting, you thrill at an exciting plot twist, or maybe you smile at a fanciful phrase and turn it over in your mind a bit before speaking it out loud. I LOVE it when that happens! I had some of this good fortune recently when I heard about the short story collection Falling in Love With Hominids by Nalo Hopkinson. I'm only a few stories into this and I know that this 2015 release may be my favorite item of 2016.

 
What it's like: Imagine Twilight Zone episodes, really good ones. Now add a splash of something that is hopeful and touching (but maybe still a bit weird). For me, that would be It's A Wonderful Life. Pepper it liberally with thoughtful, revealing, sensual dialogue. Her writing is a bit like that. There are themes around gender and culture and the future. It's science fiction, but think Octavia Butler, not Star Wars
 
Each story has its own spice. Each could have been written by a different author, but there is a tone that unites them. It might be the hopefulness, or the 'heart'. One story that doesn't end well for the main character still manages to find triumph in what we might think of as defeat. 
 
The best part, for me, is what lies ahead. She's written books that I now am keenly aware of, well-reviewed and safely ensconced on my For Later list. For right now, I want to read these short tales, written and published over a span of fourteen years, and savor them.
 
Thanks to NPR for the review that led me to this writer!

My Librarian Darcee wearing her Esme tunicIf you’re a grown woman who craves a frock with a peacock on the shoulder and a gazelle peeking around the side waist, you’re probably just going to have to go ahead and sew it yourself.

Thanks to a new book by my favorite Swedish print designer, this is totally accomplishable in a single afternoon.  Lotta Jansdotter's Everyday Style, presents crazy simple patterns for functional clothing and accessories to carry you through the seasons. While the designs are drawn from her own personal style, Jansdotter encourages women to adapt these classic pieces to suit who they are. Straight away I loved the Esme tunic that can be shortened to a modish top or lengthened to a free-spirited kaftan. I’ve been collecting (hoarding) fabric with unusual prints for years and can’t wait to transform my stash into things I can actually wear and use.

If you love textiles, modern design and fuss-free sewing, check out Lotta Jansdotter and be inspired to make your own unique something.

 

When the world gets to be too much how do you seek comfort?  When I need to duck for cover I go to my comfort reads. I look for a pleasant book with just a little bit of drama or mystery about a small town. Small town stories typically have people who care for each other. Communities that help families when they are brought low. The slow pace slows my stress level and the world seems more pleasant, or at least alright. Need some small town comfort?  Check out my new list called if you lived here you would be home now.

magneto cover

 

Graphic novels, how do I love thee?  Let me count the ways…

  • Your length is the perfect match for my commitment issues.
  • There’s so many choices, it’s difficult what to check out first.
  • You never cease to surprise me.

 

After catching up on Cullen Bunn’s Sixth Gun series, I looked for more of his work and discovered Magneto. It’s a short (four collected books) story following him as he explores a world of diminished power amid a strong legacy.

Not an X-Men aficionado?  Don't worry. Bunn successfully explores Magneto's inner workings in a way that doesn’t require a master’s degree from Marvel UniversityIn fact, it may just pull you in...

 

The Spitting Image book coverWhat images come to mind when you think about the Vietnam War?  Napalm explosions? Monks setting themselves on fire?  Jungle camouflage and booby traps?  Vietnam Vets waving protest signs and shouting?

Wait, what?  Soldiers protesting  the war? That can’t be right, it was the radical college students and long haired hippies that protested the war, right? Not according to  Jerry Lenkcke in his thought-provoking book, The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory and the Legacy of Vietnam.  

While doing research about the way society viewed the returning Vietnam vets, Lenkcke kept coming across the mention of soldiers getting off the plane on American soil and being spit on by anti-war, anti-draft protesters. Intrigued, he decided to find the source for this image - was it symbolic or did it really happen?  Could he find an example of it?

What he discovered kept me enthralled. I don’t think I will ever look at a picture of a soldier the same way again.                            

The book is well-researched, documented and supplemented by a complete filmography. If you are interested in how the media changes the way that we see the world, read The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory and the Legacy of Vietnam by Jerry Lenkcke.                                                                               

Orient by bookjacketIt’s been a cold, wet, icy winter so far; the perfect time to curl up under the covers with a big, riveting book.

Here are three books I’ve been reading lately while curled up under my afghan:

Orient by Christopher Bollen. It’s 600 pages of intrigue, murders, art, gentrification, outsiders with unknown pasts. Oh, and a weird gruesome animal mutant that might haveThe Marriage Book bookjacket been caused by a nearby biological research lab. And best of all, I didn’t guess the murderer.

The Marriage Book: Centuries of Advice, Inspiration, and Cautionary Tales from Adam & Eve to Zoloft by husband and wife, Lisa Grunwald and Stephen Adler. This is an A-to-Z treasury of marriage and anything that possibly is related to marriage. There are entries from a gamut of sources: philosophers, authors, Selp-Helf bookjacketcomedians, and poets talking about Adam and Eve to divorce to everything in between. And always remember the African proverb: "Never marry a woman with bigger feet than your own."

Selp-Helf by Miranda Sings. A book filled with ridiculous advice on how to be a better person because sometimes you just need something silly.

 

Children Of The Sun CoverNeo-nazism and punk rock share ugly and now pretty well-tracked genealogies.  Less well-documented is the once-occulted presence and resilience of gay desire amidst UK white power subcultures and splinter groups like the National Front and the British National Party. 

Max Schaefer's Children of the Sun relentlessly confronts this seeming contradiction via a time-bending collision between two queer protagonists interspersed with insanely well-researched documentation from the "golden years" of UK neo-nazi skinhead culture (roughly late 1970s-about 1990 or so).  Schaefer walks a fine line between unsparing and sympathetic in the development of Tony, a working class teen coming of age as a gay man AND a (hidden) racist skinhead.  Tony's narrative moves forward through a landscape of real-life UK far-right figures (Nicky Crane, Ian Stuart of Skrewdriver, Nick Griffin, Savitri Devi) as James, a mid-20s queer privileged "screenwriter" bankrolled by his well-to-do parents in 2003 becomes increasingly obsessed with the confused collisions between gay subcultures and UK white power movements - Nicky Crane in particular - poster boy for the NF's violent street fighters and who also came out as gay in 1992, months before he died from an AIDs-related illness. 

Schaefer's text reads like a police report, rarely stopping for extended emotional interludes (though when they do come, they hit hard).  Knowing something of Schaefer's personal background, it was never unclear where he stands in terms of the "politics" of his protagonists.  That being said, the narrative never clearly impugns Tony or James (in fact, James comes off more of a problematic dude in the end - which may have much to do with class, Schaefer implies).  Highly recommended for anyone interested in darker cultural histories.

Enchanted Air bookjacketThe Pura Belpre Award, established in 1996, is presented to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.

The award is named after Pura Belpre, the first Latina librarian at the New York Public Library who worked tirelessly with the Puerto Rican community.

The Author Award Winner - Enchanted Air - Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir by Margarita Engle is a poetic narrative of Margarita childhood living in two separated worlds during the cold war. Her story is described exquisitely and takes us to Los Angeles California where she spends most of the time and Cuba her beloved island. When the Cuban Revolution breaks down, Margarita fears for her family and her both worlds collide.

Illustrator Award Winner - Drum Dream Girl  illustrated by Rafael López, written by Margarita Engle is a tale about Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, a Chinese-African-Cuban girl in 1930s Cuba, who became a world-renowned drummer.

Check more award winners in our catalog.

 

 

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