Resources for zinesters

If you're a zinester, you make zines! If you are new to zines and have never made one: zines are usually handmade paper booklets that anyone can create. Want to give it a try? Here are some directions for turning one piece of paper into a basic zine: a version to view online or a version to print. See below for more resources about making zines and books.

Whether zines are a new idea or an old friend for you, the library abounds with inspiration and resources for your creative project! Consider these:

Crap Hound 8 - Superstitions

The Central Library Picture File is an astounding resource: thousands upon thousands of magazine and book clippings, organized by subject. These can be checked out and photocopied or scanned (you can’t cut them up and paste them in your zine, though!). Do you need the perfect picture of a bluebird, or an ancient computer, or children’s clothes from the 1960s? Look no further! Ask about the Picture Files at the Art & Music reference desk on Central Library’s third floor.

Of course clip art can be found online, but clip art books are a pleasure to browse and use. Many of these come with a CD containing image files that you can download to your computer for resizing, editing, etc. A real gem of a clip art resource is found in the series of books called Crap Hound - each volume is created around a theme or cluster of themes (Superstition; Church & State; Hands, Hearts, & Eyes are a few), and the images are laid out in the most appealing, artful way.

Women of Color zine #12The library’s zine collection is full of examples of zines and minicomics made by zinesters and artists from near and far. Zines can be browsed online in the library catalog (use the subject heading Zines or search by author or title, or try our book lists), placed  on hold, and checked out just like other library materials. I recently read the most recent issue of Women of Color: How to Live in the City of Roses and Avoid the Pricks , a collective zine made by a group in Portland - the theme of this issue, #12, is zines! It contains comics, diagrams, and short prose pieces, perspectives on making zines and community. It's really great.

How to Make Books by Esther K. SmithFor more technical information about making zines and books, you might enjoy browsing some of our books about bookbinding - I recently stumbled upon How to Make Books by Esther K. Smith, which has instructions and lovely illustrations for a range of homemade books, from instant zines and accordion books to more elaborate stitched books and Coptic binding.

Portland has an amazing zine community. Here are two local resources you must know about:

The Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC) has a gigantic and wonderful zine library, classes, and tons of equipment that members can use to make zines: typewriters, art and printmaking supplies, computers, scanners, and of course, copy machines. 

The Portland Zine Symposium is a local event, held annually in July, where zinesters gather to show, sell, and trade their publications. There are workshops, panels, and discussions about zines, independent publishing and DIY culture - it's free, and really fun and inspiring. 

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