Problem solving in science fiction

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

One of the amazing things about science fiction it that it helps us see  a greater possibility imagined: there is more that is possible in our world and in ourselves. Here are two recent reviews of books where our protagonists get creative within the confines of their situation and imagine and create greater possibilities.

The MartianThe Martian by Andy Weir

Review By Hannah Witscher, 8th grade

How do you feel about Mars? What about potatoes? Do you like realistic, thrilling science fiction? If you want to read about people creating inventions to get then out of dangerous situations, then The Martian is the book for you.  In the not-so-distant future, NASA has created a spaceship that can travel to Mars. On the third mission disaster strikes and Mark Watney is stuck on Mars and his team thinks he is dead. I really enjoyed this book. It was full of science, and everything that happened pretty much could happen with technology we will have in the near future. The story is also fast-paced, and I couldn’t put it down. If you like realistic science fiction, this is the book you should read.

 

Archivist WaspArchivist Wasp by Nicole Kornher-Stace

Review by Ella DeMerritt, Freshman

Wasp is the archivist, a ghost slayer chosen by the goddess Catchkeep to protect the people of her land from the ghosts that roam in the realm of the living. She’s forced to kill the “upstarts,” girls who want to take her place as the archivist. Our heroine is tormented by the Catchkeep-priest, her sleazy and cruel superior. Unhappy with her monotonous life, she longs to be free, but can she really be free when she has to die at the hands of an upstart to do so?

So she carries on, harboring hatred for both herself and the priest forcing her to live like this. Until something phenomenal happens. A nameless ghost comes to her for help-- which shouldn’t be possible, considering ghosts can’t speak. The ghost begs her (in an especially harsh way) to help him find his colleague, another ghost named Foster. And thus begins Wasp’s reckless journey to the underworld.

Archivist Wasp is a thrilling adventure story with a strong female character at its core, and even better, with no love interest to center the plot around. As much as I appreciate an original love story every once and a while, it’s  refreshing to read a book that’s not based around a cheesy heterosexual romantic plot. And to conclude, Archivist Wasp is a rousing sci-fi novel that you can’t seem to put down. give it a chance, you won’t be disappointed.

 

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