The mysterious and unknowable B. Traven

Mug shot of B. Traven a.k.a. Ret Marut (Otto Feige) after his arrest in London, 1923
When reading The Man Who Could Fly and other stories  by Rudolfo Anaya, a famous Chicano writer, I came across the name B. Traven. He was a German/American writer who inspired one of Anaya's stories entitled “B. Traven is Alive and Well in Cuernavaca.”  I couldn’t wait to know more about this intriguing character.  

B. Traven (1890-1969) is considered one of the most international literary mysteries of the twentieth century, because he refused personal data to publishers. Author of 12 fiction novels and several short stories, most of his books were originally written in German and were first published in Germany.  His real name, date place of birth and nationality are still begin questioned, which makes me think that he might be hiding his identity on purpose to gain more public attention or as a kind of strategic marketing maybe?

I became a bit obsessed with trying to know more about Traven. My quest began with The Treasure of the Sierra Madre a book that was adapted to a film of the same name. The film won an Academy Award in 1948; another of his remarkable works is The Death Ship”: The story of an American Sailor  written in German and then translated into 12 languages including English. Both books led to him to international popularity.

It’s estimated that he used at least twenty seven aliases and many researchers are convinced that he is more than one person.

It’s amazing how books connect us with other important events and characters. I started by reading a Chicano writer and followed my curiousity to learn about B. Traven. Something else I found out going through this journey is that Macario, one of my favorite movies ever, was adapted from a short story by B. Traven --  or whoever the real person was. 

Comments

'Treasure of the Sierra Madre' is one of MY favs. How interesting to learn this backstory by following a mysterious German! Thank you, Laura
Check out new findings. Google....P Wood B Traven
I found all of his books as a young, revolution-minded person in my twenties; was lucky enough to see the exhibition devoted to him at the museum of modern art in Mexico city! Was it Traven who worked with John Huston on the "Treasure of the Sierra Madre", pretending to be Traven's chosen advosir to the project? His novels are the thing, however!

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