Future power: sustainable energy for the next century

wind turbines

How will we power the future?  Will we harness the wind that blows across the plains? Will we build a collective of small, modular nuclear fission reactors, safer and more efficient than today's ungainly nuclear power plants?  Or maybe the success of giant solar plants like California's Ivanpah Solar Power Tower will inspire more solar projects?  Already, there are eleven states that generate electricity from renewable sources at double the U.S. average (not including hydropower).  Which states?  Take a guess.

There are a variety of renewable power options that could prove successful in the future.  All of them carry advantages and disadvantages, of course.  You'll find unbiased information on both sides at procon.org, including neatly laid out arguments for and against lots of different energy sources.  There is also a detailed historical timeline of energy source development that covers over 4000 years of human energy consumption.

So where will the future of energy take us?  Wind energy is the fastest growing energy source in the world now, with lots of potential benefits.  Hydropower is the renewable energy source that produces the most electricity in the U.S., though tidal energy (one kind of hydropower) has yet to be developed in this country.  Biofuels and bioprospecting are an exciting potential source of clean energy.  Solar power, on the other hand, was humankind's first source of energy, and may still be part of our diversified energy future, as explained below by Crash Course's Hank Green.

Want more information on sustainable energy sources?  Ask a librarian!

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