Are books still "banned"?

The short answer is, Yes, people still try to ban books

Here's a recent example right here in Oregon.  In January 2014 some parents in Sweet Home challenged the use in an 8th grade Language Arts class of the critically acclaimed Book Coveryoung adult novel The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie.  According to an article in the Albany Democrat Herald, two parents asked for the book to be removed from the 8th grade curriculum. 

The result?  Again reported by the Democrat Herald, on February 13, 2014, after 3 hours of public testimony the Sweet Home School District reconsideration committee "voted Wednesday to retain the young adult novel, but [the superintendent] will be responsible for determining the appropriate grade level for its use..."

What's the fuss about?

"This work of young adult fiction tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to improve his future, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, [the book], which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings...chronicles the adolescence of one Native American teen as he attempts to break away from the life he thought he was destined to live." --Amazon.com

Even though the book received the 2007 National Book Award for Young People's Literature, it's also been the center of controversy for profanity, racism, discussion of sex, abuse and alcoholism.  But as one of the teachers said, "...it's use...prompts the most intense discussions about racism, bullying, tolerance and the daily choices students make in handling relationships." 

I think that's worth keeping.  What do you think?

And remember, if you need more help be sure to Ask the Librarian!

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